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Reports Summarize Nanofiltration Study Results from Yonsei University (Comparison of drinking water pollutant removal using a nanofiltration pilot...

August 29, 2014



Reports Summarize Nanofiltration Study Results from Yonsei University (Comparison of drinking water pollutant removal using a nanofiltration pilot plant powered by renewable energy and a conventional treatment facility)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Energy Weekly News -- Researchers detail new data in Nanofiltration. According to news reporting from Seoul, South Korea, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated, "In this paper, drinking water pollutant removal between a conventional drinking water treatment and a nanofiltration (NF) pilot plant powered by renewable energy is compared. This kind of plant can be very useful for isolated locations with water quality problems."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Yonsei University, "Energy consumption and related CO2 emissions and the occurrence of synthetic organic compounds in drinking water sources are important environmental and public health issues. NF membranes were used to improve drinking water quality from a holistic point of view. Compared to conventional drinking water treatment, membranes efficiently removed color and turbidity (100%), DOC (93%), ions (97%), and metals and metalloids (ranging from 80% to 100%), but not boron (17%) or pharmaceuticals (Ph's) (varied from 15% to 100%, but still always above conventional treatment). Moreover, NF membranes removed 53% of the trihalomethanes (THMs) present in conventionally treated water. Analyses of 93 persistent organic compounds (VOCs, BTEXs, PAHs, DEs, pesticides...) were carried out, but none of the compounds were detected in the three types of water analyzed (reservoir, conventionally treatment and NF permeate). Reservoir water has a strong hydrophilic composition due to protein-like substances that can promote biofouling."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "NF membranes effectively removed the hydrophobic fraction (66%)."

For more information on this research see: Comparison of drinking water pollutant removal using a nanofiltration pilot plant powered by renewable energy and a conventional treatment facility. Desalination, 2014;347():94-102. Desalination can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Desalination - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/502683)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting N. Garcia-Vaquero, Yonsei University, Sch Civil & Environm Engn, Dept. of Civil & Environm Engn, Seoul 120749, South Korea. Additional authors for this research include E. Lee, R.J. Castaneda, J. Cho and J.A. Lopez-Ramirez.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Seoul, Oil & Gas, South Korea, Nanofiltration, Nanotechnology, Renewable Energy, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Energy Weekly News


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