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Reports Outline Nanoparticles Study Results from University of Kentucky (Applying accelerator mass spectrometry for low-level detection of complex...

August 29, 2014



Reports Outline Nanoparticles Study Results from University of Kentucky (Applying accelerator mass spectrometry for low-level detection of complex engineered nanoparticles in biological media)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Nanoparticles. According to news reporting out of Lexington, Kentucky, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Complex engineered nanoparticles (CENPs), which have different core and surface components, are being developed for medicinal, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. One of the key challenges for environmental health and safety assessments of CENPs is to identify and quantity their transformations in biological environments."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Kentucky, "This study reports the effects of in vivo exposure of citrate-coated nanoalumina with different rare isotope labels on each component. This CENP was dosed to the rat and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to quantify (26)Al, (14)C, and their ratio in the dosing material and tissue samples. For CENPs detected in the liver, the rare isotope ratio, (14)C/(26)Al, was 87% of the dosing material's ratio. The citrate coating on the nanoalumina in the liver was stable or, if it degraded, its metabolites were incorporated with nearby tissues. However, in brain and bone where little alumina was detected, the rare isotope ratio greatly exceeded that of the dosing material. Therefore, in the animal, citrate dissociated from CENPs and redistributed to brain and bone."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Tracking both the core and surface components by AMS presents a new approach for characterizing transformations of CENPs components in biological milieu or environments."

For more information on this research see: Applying accelerator mass spectrometry for low-level detection of complex engineered nanoparticles in biological media. Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, 2014;97():81-7. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/525434)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting B. Wang, Departments of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, United States. Additional authors for this research include G.S. Jackson, R.A. Yokel and E.A Grulke (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Kentucky, Lexington, United States, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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