News Column

Patent Issued for Methods and Materials for Reducing Biofilms

August 29, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- A patent by the inventors Frank, Kristi L. (Minneapolis, MN); Patel, Robin (Rochester, MN), filed on February 6, 2013, was published online on August 12, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Alexandria, Virginia, by NewsRx correspondents (see also Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research).

Patent number 8802414 is assigned to Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (Rochester, MN).

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "This document relates to methods and materials involved in reducing biofilms. For example, this document provides enzymes (e.g., glycosyl hydrolases) and methods for using enzymes to reduce biofilms.

"Bacteria growing in biofilms are estimated to be involved in greater than 60 percent of all human bacterial infections. Biofilms are dynamic populations of bacteria in a surface-associated mode of growth that are covered in a protective, self-excreted extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix. Biofilms provide protection against harsh environmental conditions, traditional antimicrobial therapies, and host immune defenses, thus making biofilm-associated infections difficult to treat. Biofilm-associated infections of indwelling medical devices (e.g., intravascular and urinary catheters, prosthetic heart valves, prosthetic joint implants, and hardware) represent a particularly important health problem, as removal and replacement of infected devices is often required.

"The EPS matrix of a diverse number of biofilm-forming bacterial species can be composed of chains of polymeric .beta.-1,6-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (PNAG). Biofilm-forming strains of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Bordetella spp., Actinobacillus spp., and Escherichia coli are known to utilize PNAG as a major component of their EPS biofilm matrix (Cramton et al., Infect. Immun., 67:5427-5433 (1999); Kaplan et al., J. Bacteriol., 186:8213-8220 (2004); Mack et al., J. Bacteriol., 178:175-183 (1996); Parise et al., J. Bacteriol., 189:750-760 (2007); and Wang et al., J. Bacteriol., 186:2724-2734 (2004)). The N-acetyl-.beta.-hexosaminidase, dispersin B, first purified from the Gram negative periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Kaplan et al., J. Bacteriol., 185:4693-8 (2003)), can cleave the .beta.-1,6-linkages of PNAG in the biofilm matrices of Staphylococcus spp., Yersinia pestis, Actinobacillus spp., Bordetella spp., and E. coli (Itoh et al., J. Bacteriol., 187:382-387 (2005); Kaplan et al., J. Bacteriol., 185:4693-8 (2003); Kaplan et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., 48:2633-2636 (2004); Kaplan et al., J. Bacteriol., 186:8213-8220 (2004); and Parise et al, J. Bacteriol., 189:750-760 (2007))."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent, NewsRx journalists also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "This document provides methods and materials related to reducing biofilms. For example, this document provides enzymes (e.g., glycosyl hydrolases), nucleic acid molecules encoding enzymes, host cells containing nucleic acid encoding enzymes, and methods for using enzymes to reduce biofilms and infections associated with biofilms. Reducing biofilms and infections associated with biofilms can allow clinicians to treat patients effectively and can help reduce the incidence of infections in mammals (e.g., mammals containing or using a medical device that is susceptible to biofilms).

"S. lugdunensis is an atypically virulent Gram positive human pathogen that is able to form biofilms (Frank et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., 51:888-895 (2007)). As described herein, a polypeptide obtained from S. lugdunensis can have glycosyl hydrolase activity and can be used as a biofilm-releasing enzyme to treat or prevent a range of biofilm-associated bacterial infections.

"In general, one aspect of this document features an isolated nucleic acid molecule that encodes a polypeptide having a length of at least 300 amino acid residues and at least about 95 percent identity to the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:2 over the length. The polypeptide can comprise a glycosyl hydrolase activity. The isolated nucleic acid molecule can comprise the nucleic acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1.

"In another aspect, this document features an isolated nucleic acid molecule comprising at least 15 nucleotides in length, wherein the isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes under hybridization conditions to the sense or antisense strand of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1. The hybridization conditions can be highly stringent hybridization conditions. The isolated nucleic acid molecule can comprise at least 1000 nucleotides in length. The isolated nucleic acid molecule can comprise the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1.

"In another aspect, this document features a cell comprising an isolated nucleic acid molecule that (a) encodes a polypeptide having a length of at least 300 amino acid residues and at least about 95 percent identity to the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:2 over the length, or (b) comprises at least 15 nucleotides in length, wherein the isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes under hybridization conditions to the sense or antisense strand of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1. The cell can be a prokaryotic cell.

"In another aspect, this document features a substantially pure polypeptide comprising an amino acid sequence having a length of at least 300 amino acid residues and at least about 95 percent identity to the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:2 over the length. The polypeptide can comprise a glycosyl hydrolase activity. The polypeptide can be encoded by a nucleic acid molecule comprising the nucleic acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1. The polypeptide can comprise the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:2.

"In another aspect, this document features a method for reducing biofilm present on a surface, wherein the method comprises contacting the surface with a polypeptide of claim 10 under conditions wherein the presence of the biofilm on the surface is reduced. The biofilm can comprise pathogenic bacteria. The surface can be a surface of a catheter. The polypeptide can comprise a glycosyl hydrolase activity. The polypeptide can be encoded by a nucleic acid molecule comprising the nucleic acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1. The polypeptide can comprise the amino acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:2. The presence of the biofilm on the surface can be reduced to below the level of detection after the contacting step.

"Unless otherwise defined, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention pertains. Although methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used to practice the invention, suitable methods and materials are described below. All publications, patent applications, patents, and other references mentioned herein are incorporated by reference in their entirety. In case of conflict, the present specification, including definitions, will control. In addition, the materials, methods, and examples are illustrative only and not intended to be limiting.

"The details of one or more embodiments of the invention are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims."

URL and more information on this patent, see: Frank, Kristi L.; Patel, Robin. Methods and Materials for Reducing Biofilms. U.S. Patent Number 8802414, filed February 6, 2013, and published online on August 12, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8802414.PN.&OS=PN/8802414RS=PN/8802414

Keywords for this news article include: Peptides, Proteins, Amino Acids, Legal Issues, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Bacterial Infections and Mycoses, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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