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Investigators at University of Sorocaba Discuss Findings in Nanoparticles (Preparation, Characterization, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity Evaluations...

August 26, 2014



Investigators at University of Sorocaba Discuss Findings in Nanoparticles (Preparation, Characterization, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity Evaluations of Thiolated- and S-Nitrosated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Implications for ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Nanoparticles is the subject of a report. According to news reporting from Sao Paulo, Brazil, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for an increasing number of biomedical applications, such as drug delivery. To this end, toxicological studies of their potent effects in biological media must be better evaluated."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Sorocaba, "The aim of this study was to synthesize, characterize, and examine the potential in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of thiolated (SH) and S-nitrosated (S-NO) iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles toward healthy and cancer cell lines. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation techniques and coated with small thiol-containing molecules, such as mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) or meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). The physical chemical, morphological, and magnetic properties of thiol-coating Fe3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques. The thiol groups on the surface of the nanoparticles were nitrosated, leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA- or S-nitroso-DMSA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of thiolated and S-nitrosated nanoparticles were more deeply evaluated in healthy (3T3, human lymphocytes cells, and chinese hamster ovary cells) and cancer cell lines (MCF-7). The results demonstrated that thiol-coating iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have few toxic effects in cells, whereas S-nitrosated-coated particles did cause toxic effects. Moreover, due to the superaramagnetic behavior of S-nitroso-Fe3O4 nanopartides, those particles can be guided to the target site upon the application of an external magnetic field, leading to local toxic effects in the tumor cells."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Taken together, the results suggest the promise of S-nitroso-mgnetic nanopartides in cancer treatment."

For more information on this research see: Preparation, Characterization, Cytotoxicity, and Genotoxicity Evaluations of Thiolated- and S-Nitrosated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Implications for Cancer Treatment. Chemical Research in Toxicology, 2014;27(7):1207-1218. Chemical Research in Toxicology can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Chemical Research in Toxicology - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/crtoec)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.B. Seabra, Univ Sorocaba, Dept. of Biotechnol, BR-18023000 Sao Paulo, Brazil. Additional authors for this research include T. Pasquoto, A.C.F. Ferrarini, M.D. Santos, P.S. Haddad and R. de Lima (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Brazil, Sao Paulo, South America, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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