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Findings from West Chester University Provides New Data about 17-Ketosteroids (Investigation of the Role of Androstenedione-19-oic Acid in the...

August 26, 2014



Findings from West Chester University Provides New Data about 17-Ketosteroids (Investigation of the Role of Androstenedione-19-oic Acid in the Presence of 19-Norandrostenedione in Intact Male Horse Plasma Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on 17-Ketosteroids are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting out of West Chester, Pennsylvania, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to confirm the presence of androstenedione-19-oic acid in intact male equine plasma and to show the source of 19-norandrostenedione in equine plasma. Androstenedione-19-oic acid was recovered from acidified plasma by liquid-liquid extraction using methyl tert-butyl ether and separated on an Ace 5 C-8 column."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from West Chester University, "A triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to detect the analytes in negative electrospray ionization mode. Limits of detection, quantification, and confirmation of the method were 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The linear dynamic range of quantification was 0.5-50 ng/mL. The presence of androstenedione-19-oic acid was confirmed in all plasma samples obtained from intact male horses but not those from gelded and female horses; the average concentration was 3.1 +/- 1.6 ng/mL, suggesting androstenedione-19-oic acid is an endogenous compound only in intact male horse plasma samples. The conversion of androstenedione-19-oic acid to 19-norandrostenedione in equine plasma was demonstrated by spiking androstenedione-19-oic acid into blank plasma and monitoring the generation of 19-norandrostenedione and its increase in concentration during storage. Results indicated that androstenedione-19-oic acid was readily converted into 19-norandrostenedione; the higher the storage temperature, the faster the conversion. The conversion was not affected by the types of plasma samples collected from gelded and female horses or by anticoagulants used in blood collection to harvest plasma."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Compared with other matrices such as water, methanol, and phosphate-buffered saline, the conversion of androstenedione-19-oic to 19-norandrostenedione in equine plasma was faster, suggesting that there is an unknown factor(s) in equine plasma that enhances the conversion."

For more information on this research see: Investigation of the Role of Androstenedione-19-oic Acid in the Presence of 19-Norandrostenedione in Intact Male Horse Plasma Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 2014;34(7):860-869. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Inc, 360 Park Ave South, New York, NY 10010-1710, USA. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Equine Veterinary Science - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/636592)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y.W. You, W Chester Univ, PA Equine Toxicol & Res Center, Dept. of Chem, W Chester, PA 19382, United States. Additional authors for this research include C.E. Uboh, L.R. Soma, F.Y. Guan, D. Taylor, X.Q. Li, Y. Liu and D. Tsang (see also 17-Ketosteroids).

Keywords for this news article include: West Chester, Pennsylvania, United States, 17-Ketosteroids, Androstenedione, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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