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Findings from Soochow University Yields New Findings on Nanocarriers (Reduction-Responsive Polymeric Micelles and Vesicles for Triggered...

August 26, 2014



Findings from Soochow University Yields New Findings on Nanocarriers (Reduction-Responsive Polymeric Micelles and Vesicles for Triggered Intracellular Drug Release)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Nanocarriers. According to news reporting out of Suzhou, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The therapeutic effects of current micellar and vesicular drug formulations are restricted by slow and inefficient drug release at the pathological site. The development of smart polymeric nanocarriers that release drugs upon arriving at the target site has received a tremendous amount of attention for cancer therapy."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The therapeutic effects of current micellar and vesicular drug formulations are restricted by slow and inefficient drug release at the pathological site. The development of smart polymeric nanocarriers that release drugs upon arriving at the target site has received a tremendous amount of attention for cancer therapy. Recent Advances: Taking advantage of a high reducing potential in the tumor tissues and in particular inside the tumor cells, various reduction-sensitive polymeric micelles and vesicles have been designed and explored for triggered anticancer drug release. These reduction-responsive nanosystems have demonstrated several unique features, such as good stability under physiological conditions, fast response to intracellular reducing environment, triggering drug release right in the cytosol and cell nucleus, and significantly improved antitumor activity, compared to traditional reduction-insensitive counterparts. Critical Issues: Although reduction-sensitive micelles and polymersomes have accomplished rapid intracellular drug release and enhanced in vitro antitumor effect, their fate inside the cells including the mechanism, site, and rate of reduction reaction remains unclear. Moreover, the systemic fate and performance of reduction-sensitive polymeric drug formulations have to be investigated. Future Directions: Biophysical studies should be carried out to gain insight into the degradation and drug release behaviors of reduction-responsive nanocarriers inside the tumor cells. Furthermore, novel ligand-decorated reduction-sensitive nanoparticulate drug formulations should be designed and explored for targeted cancer therapy in vivo."

For more information on this research see: Reduction-Responsive Polymeric Micelles and Vesicles for Triggered Intracellular Drug Release. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, 2014;21(5):755-767. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling can be contacted at: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc, 140 Huguenot Street, 3RD Fl, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA. (Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. - www.liebertpub.com; Antioxidants & Redox Signaling - www.liebertpub.com/overview/antioxidants-and-redox-signaling/4/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting H.L. Sun, Soochow Univ, Coll Chem Chem Engn & Mat Sci, Dept. of Polymer Sci & EngnBiomed Polymers Lab, Jiangsu Key Lab Adv Funct Polymer Design & Applic, Suzhou 215123, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include F.H. Meng, R. Cheng, C. Deng and Z.Y. Zhong (see also Nanocarriers).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Suzhou, Nanocarriers, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, People's Republic of China

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Weekly


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