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Findings from Renmin University of China Provides New Data on Bacteriophages (Removal of bacteriophage f2 in water by nanoscale zero-valent iron and...

August 26, 2014



Findings from Renmin University of China Provides New Data on Bacteriophages (Removal of bacteriophage f2 in water by nanoscale zero-valent iron and parameters optimization using response surface methodology)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Bacteriophages are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Beijing, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "The presence of pathogenic enteric viruses in water poses a significant risk to human health. Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has recently been proposed for various environmental remediation due to its unique characteristics."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Renmin University of China, "Bacteriophage f2, which is similar to human enteric pathogenic virus, was used as the model virus to study the virus removal efficiency in the water by NZVI in this study. Response surface methodology (RSM), based on a three-level, four-variable Box-Behnken design, was applied to optimizing the experimental parameters. The results revealed that NZVI showed a brilliant ability in terms of removing bacteriophage f2 and was definitely more efficient than commercial iron particles. The removal rate was increased with the increase of NZVI dose and rotation rate, but decreased with the increase of pH value and virus concentration. The removal process involved reversible adsorption. The bacteriophage f2 with a lower concentration was more sensitive to acid condition. The determination coefficient (R-2) for data fitting was 97.66%, which indicated that the model was adequate for prediction. The interaction between NZVI dose and rotation rate had a significant effect on the removal rate of virus, as well as the four independent variables. The optimum values of experimental parameters were as follows: pH value: 5.12, NZVI dose: 49.07 mg L-1, virus concentration: 3.5 x 10(6) PFU/mL, rotation rate: 148.75 rpm."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Under this condition, 5.51 log removal was achieved, which was in close agreement with the value predicted from the proposed model."

For more information on this research see: Removal of bacteriophage f2 in water by nanoscale zero-valent iron and parameters optimization using response surface methodology. Chemical Engineering Journal, 2014;252():150-158. Chemical Engineering Journal can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Sa, PO Box 564, 1001 Lausanne, Switzerland. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Chemical Engineering Journal - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/601273)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R. Cheng, Renmin Univ China, Sch Environm & Nat Resources, Beijing 100872, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include G.Q. Li, C. Cheng, P. Liu, L. Shi, Z. Ma and X. Zheng (see also Bacteriophages).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Beijing, Viruses, Nanoscale, Bacteriophages, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, People's Republic of China

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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