News Column

NASA Selects U.S. Small Business Technology Transfer Projects

August 16, 2014

NASA has chosen 23 proposals from small business and research institution teams to continue the development of technologies that will support future agency mission needs and may also prove viable as commercial products and services.

The agency reported that the Phase II selectees in NASA's Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program are permitted to enter negotiations for possible contract awards, worth a combined total of approximately $17.2 million.

According to a NASA release, technologies selected for further development under STTR Phase II will demonstrate the feasibility of new propellants for in-space propulsion, increase capabilities to perform autonomous navigations, and advance new methods for the manufacturing of materials. High-tech firms in 13 states also have submitted selected proposals in partnership with research institutions spread out among 15 states.

"As teams in our Small Business Technology Transfer Program move into this second phase of development, we'll see innovative concepts mature into technologies that can enhance our exploration plans on journeys to asteroids and Mars, while benefitting our technology based economy here on Earth," said Michael Gazarik, NASA's associate administrator for space technology in Washington. "Through modest investments in technology development among American small business and research institution teams, we're developing the new knowledge and capabilities needed to keep NASA leading the way forward in space exploration, while also keeping America in the lead in high- tech business enterprises."

Under Phase I teams performed feasibility studies to evaluate the scientific and technical merit of an idea. Phase II will expand on the results of the Phase I work, with as much as $750,000 to support research for as long as two additional years.

NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA's future missions.

More information:

sbir.nasa.gov

www.nasa.gov/spacetech

www.nasa.gov

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