News Column

Patent Application Titled "Low-Complexity Optical Force Sensor for a Medical Device" Published Online

August 21, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- According to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews journalists, a patent application by the inventor Klimovitch, Gleb V. (Santa Clara, CA), filed on January 29, 2013, was made available online on August 7, 2014.

The assignee for this patent application is St. Jude Medical, Atrial Fibrillation Division Inc.

Reporters obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "a. Technical Field

"The instant disclosure relates to elongate medical devices, such as catheters and introducers, for example. More specifically, the instant disclosure relates to the detection and measurement of external forces on an elongate medical device.

"b. Background Art

"Catheters are used for an ever-growing number of procedures, including diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Such procedures involve navigating the catheter through the patient's vasculature to a biological site and, for some procedures and some catheters, initiating and/or maintaining contact between the tip of the catheter and tissue. During such navigation and procedures, it may be desirable to assess the deformation of the catheter tip and/or the force applied to the tip of the catheter to determine if there is contact between the catheter tip and tissue and to ensure that the amount of force does not become so great that the catheter tip inadvertently damages the tissue, such as by puncturing the tissue.

"Many systems and methods are known for assessing the force on a catheter tip. However, known systems generally either involve multiple sensors (and thus may be more complicated or larger than desired) or do not detect force with sufficient degrees of freedom (for example, magnitude and/or direction of deflection and/or twisting).

"The foregoing discussion is intended only to illustrate the present field and should not be taken as a disavowal of claim scope."

In addition to obtaining background information on this patent application, VerticalNews editors also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent application: "An embodiment of an apparatus for detecting deformation of an elongate body may comprise a light source configured to provide light of multiple frequencies and/or frequency bands, an optical receiver configured to receive light from the light source, and a filter disposed between the light source and the optical receiver. The filter may comprise multiple segments, each of the segments configured to filter light at one of the frequencies so as to alter the amount of light incident on the optical receiver. A total amount of light detected by the optical receiver may be indicative of deformation of the elongate body.

"An embodiment of an elongate medical device may comprise an elongate shaft having a distal end portion and a light source configured to provide light of multiple frequencies and/or frequency bands along an optical path, the optical path disposed within the distal end portion of the elongate shaft. The elongate medical device may further comprise an optical receiver configured to receive light projected along the optical path and a filter disposed in the optical path. The filter may comprise multiple segments, each of the segments configured to filter light at one of the frequencies and/or frequency bands so as to reduce the amount of light incident on the optical receiver.

"A system for assessing force on a medical device may comprise an electronic control unit (ECU) configured to receive a signal generated by an optical receiver responsive to multiple frequencies of light, the multiple frequencies and/or frequency bands of light received by the optical receiver in a predetermined sequence, and process the signal in accordance with the predetermined sequence to determine an external force applied to the medical device.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"FIG. 1 is an isometric view of an elongate medical device.

"FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic view of an embodiment of an optical force sensor that may be used with the elongate medical device of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic view of an optical filter of the optical force sensor of FIG. 2 with a light beam projection incident thereon.

"FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic view of the optical filter of FIG. 3, with the incident light beam projection shifted on the optical filter.

"FIG. 5 is a diagrammatic view of the optical filter of FIG. 3, with the incident light beam projection rotated on the optical filter.

"FIG. 6 is a schematic view of a system that may be used for determining deformation characteristics and external forces on the elongate medical device of FIG. 1 using an optical force sensor.

"FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view of another embodiment of an optical force sensor that may be used with the elongate medical device of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic view of another embodiment of an optical force sensor that may be used with the elongate medical device of FIG. 1."

For more information, see this patent application: Klimovitch, Gleb V. Low-Complexity Optical Force Sensor for a Medical Device. Filed January 29, 2013 and posted August 7, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=5875&p=118&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140731.PD.&OS=PD/20140731&RS=PD/20140731

Keywords for this news article include: St. Jude Medical Atrial Fibrillation Division Inc.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Politics & Government Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters