News Column

New Physics Findings from University of Colorado Discussed (Topological polymer dispersed liquid crystals with bulk nematic defect lines pinned to...

August 19, 2014



New Physics Findings from University of Colorado Discussed (Topological polymer dispersed liquid crystals with bulk nematic defect lines pinned to handlebody surfaces)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Physics Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Physics. According to news reporting out of Boulder, Colorado, by VerticalNews editors, research stated, "Polymer dispersed liquid crystals are a useful model system for studying the relationship between surface topology and defect structures. They are comprised of a polymer matrix with suspended spherical nematic drops and are topologically constrained to host defects of an elementary hedgehog charge per droplet, such as bulk or surface point defects or closed disclination loops."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Colorado, "We control the genus of the closed surfaces confining such micrometer-sized nematic drops with tangential boundary conditions for molecular alignment imposed by the polymer matrix, allowing us to avoid defects or, on the contrary, to generate them in a controlled way. We show, both experimentally and through numerical modeling, that topological constraints in nematic microdrops can be satisfied by hosting topologically stable half-integer bulk defect lines anchored to opposite sides of handlebody surfaces."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This enriches the interplay of topologies of closed surfaces and fields with nonpolar symmetry, yielding new unexpected configurations that cannot be realized in vector fields, having potential implications for topologically similar defects in cosmology and other fields."

For more information on this research see: Topological polymer dispersed liquid crystals with bulk nematic defect lines pinned to handlebody surfaces. Physical Review Letters, 2014;112(19):197801. (American Physical Society - www.aps.org/; Physical Review Letters - prl.aps.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M.G. Campbell, Dept. of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 USA. and Liquid Crystal Materials Research Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, United States. Additional authors for this research include M. Tasinkevych and I.I Smalyukh.

Keywords for this news article include: Boulder, Physics, Colorado, United States, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Physics Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters