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Investigators from National Taiwan University Target Applied Physical Science (Residue-free fabrication of high-performance graphene devices by...

August 19, 2014



Investigators from National Taiwan University Target Applied Physical Science (Residue-free fabrication of high-performance graphene devices by patterned PMMA stencil mask)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Physics Week -- Current study results on Applied Physical Science have been published. According to news reporting originating from Taipei, Taiwan, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals and their hybrid structures have recently attracted much attention due to their potential applications. The fabrication of metallic contacts or nanostructures on 2D materials is very common and generally achieved by performing electron-beam (e-beam) lithography."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from National Taiwan University, "However, e-beam lithography is not applicable in certain situations, e. g., cases in which the e-beam resist does not adhere to the substrates or the intrinsic properties of the 2D materials are greatly altered and degraded. Here, we present a residue-free approach for fabricating high-performance graphene devices by patterning a thin film of e-beam resist as a stencil mask. This technique can be generally applied to substrates with varying surface conditions, while causing negligible residues on graphene. The technique also preserves the design flexibility offered by e-beam lithography and therefore allows us to fabricate multi-probe metallic contacts."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The graphene field-effect transistors fabricated by this method exhibit smooth surfaces, high mobility, and distinct magnetotransport properties, confirming the advantages and versatility of the presented residue-free technique for the fabrication of devices composed of 2D materials."

For more information on this research see: Residue-free fabrication of high-performance graphene devices by patterned PMMA stencil mask. AIP Advances, 2014;4(6):331-336. AIP Advances can be contacted at: Amer Inst Physics, Circulation & Fulfillment Div, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Ste 1 N O 1, Melville, NY 11747-4501, USA. (American Institute of Physics - www.aip.org/; AIP Advances - aipadvances.aip.org/)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting F.Y. Shih, National Taiwan University, Dept. of Mat Sci & Engn, Taipei 10617, Taiwan. Additional authors for this research include S.Y. Chen, C.H. Liu, P.H. Ho, T.S. Wu, C.W. Chen, Y.F. Chen and W.H. Wang.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Taipei, Taiwan, Applied Physical Science

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Source: Physics Week


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