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Study Findings on Gene Therapy Are Outlined in Reports from Free University (Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies...

August 21, 2014



Study Findings on Gene Therapy Are Outlined in Reports from Free University (Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gene Therapy Weekly -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news reporting from Amsterdam, Netherlands, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) became the first clinically approved gene therapy product in the western world. To develop AAV for future clinical application in a widespread patient base, particularly in therapies which require intravenous (i.v.) administration of vector, the virus must be able to evade preexisting antibodies to the wild type virus."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Free University, "Here we demonstrate that in mice, AAV vectors associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) can evade human anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies. We observed different antibody evasion and gene transfer abilities with populations of EVs isolated by different centrifugal forces. EV-associated AAV vector (ev-AAV) was up to 136-fold more resistant over a range of neutralizing antibody concentrations relative to standard AAV vector in vitro. Importantly in mice, at a concentration of passively transferred human antibodies which decreased i.v. administered standard AAV transduction of brain by 80%, transduction of ev-AAV transduction was not reduced and was 4000-fold higher. Finally, we show that expressing a brain targeting peptide on the EV surface allowed significant enhancement of transduction compared to untargeted ev-AAV."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Using ev-AAV represents an effective, clinically relevant approach to evade human neutralizing anti-AAV antibodies after systemic administration of vector."

For more information on this research see: Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo. Biomaterials, 2014;35(26):7598-7609. Biomaterials can be contacted at: Elsevier Sci Ltd, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, Oxon, England. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting B. Gyorgy, Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Additional authors for this research include Z. Fitzpatrick, M.H.W. Crommentuijn, D. Mu and C.A. Maguire (see also Biotechnology).

Keywords for this news article include: Antibodies, Biotechnology, Europe, Amsterdam, Immunology, Netherlands, Gene Therapy, Bioengineering, Blood Proteins, Immunoglobulins

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Gene Therapy Weekly


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