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Studies from Yale University Have Provided New Data on Central Nervous System Diseases (Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking...

August 18, 2014



Studies from Yale University Have Provided New Data on Central Nervous System Diseases (Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Pain & Central Nervous System Week -- Data detailed on Central Nervous System Diseases have been presented. According to news reporting out of New Haven, Connecticut, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that restricts the entry of immune cells and mediators into the central nervous system (CNS), a small number of peripheral leukocytes can traverse the BBB and infiltrate into the CNS. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the major routes through which trafficking leukocytes migrate into the CNS."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Yale University, "Therefore, the number of leukocytes and their phenotypic compositions in the CSF may represent important sources to investigate immune-to-brain interactions or diagnose and monitor neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the paucity of trafficking leucocytes in the CSF, a technology capable of efficient isolation, enumeration, and molecular typing of these cells in the clinical settings has not been achieved. In this study, we report on a biofunctionalized silicon nanowire array chip for highly efficient capture and multiplexed phenotyping of rare trafficking leukocytes in small quantities (50 microliters) of clinical CSF specimens collected from neurodegenerative disease patients. The antibody coated 3D nanostructured materials exhibited vastly improved rare cell capture efficiency due to high-affinity binding and enhanced cell-substrate interactions. Moreover, our platform creates multiple cell capture interfaces, each of which can selectively isolate specific leukocyte phenotypes. A comparison with the traditional immunophenotyping using flow cytometry demonstrated that our novel silicon nanowire-based rare cell analysis platform can perform rapid detection and simultaneous molecular characterization of heterogeneous immune cells. Multiplexed molecular typing of rare leukocytes in CSF samples collected from Alzheimer's disease patients revealed the elevation of white blood cell counts and significant alterations in the distribution of major leukocyte phenotypes."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Our technology represents a practical tool for potentially diagnosing and monitoring the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases by allowing an effective hematological analysis of the CSF from patients."

For more information on this research see: Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology. Nanoscale, 2014;6(12):6537-50. (Royal Society of Chemistry - www.rsc.org/; Nanoscale - pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/nr)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M. Kwak, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, United States. Additional authors for this research include D.J. Kim, M.R. Lee, Y. Wu, L. Han, S.K. Lee and R. Fan (see also Central Nervous System Diseases).

Keywords for this news article include: New Haven, Pathology, Immunology, Leukocytes, Connecticut, Blood Cells, United States, Immune System, Nanotechnology, Silicon Nanowires, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America, Central Nervous System Diseases.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Pain & Central Nervous System Week


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