News Column

Studies from University of California Have Provided New Information about Microscopy (Improving Signal to Noise in Labeled Biological Specimens Using...

August 22, 2014



Studies from University of California Have Provided New Information about Microscopy (Improving Signal to Noise in Labeled Biological Specimens Using Energy-Filtered TEM of Sections with a Drift Correction Strategy and a Direct Detection Device)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Energy Weekly News -- New research on Microscopy is the subject of a report. According to news reporting out of La Jolla, California, by VerticalNews editors, research stated, "Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy techniques are regularly used to build elemental maps of spatially distributed nanoparticles in materials and biological specimens. When working with thick biological sections, electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques involving core-loss electrons often require exposures exceeding several minutes to provide sufficient signal to noise."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of California, "Image quality with these long exposures is often compromised by specimen drift, which results in blurring and reduced resolution. To mitigate drift artifacts, a series of short exposure images can be acquired, aligned, and merged to form a single image. For samples where the target elements have extremely low signal yields, the use of charge coupled device (CCD)-based detectors for this purpose can be problematic. At short acquisition times, the images produced by CCDs can be noisy and may contain fixed pattern artifacts that impact subsequent correlative alignment. Here we report on the use of direct electron detection devices (DDD's) to increase the signal to noise as compared with CCD's. A 3x improvement in signal is reported with a DDD versus a comparably formatted CCD, with equivalent dose on each detector."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "With the fast rolling-readout design of the DDD, the duty cycle provides a major benefit, as there is no dead time between successive frames."

For more information on this research see: Improving Signal to Noise in Labeled Biological Specimens Using Energy-Filtered TEM of Sections with a Drift Correction Strategy and a Direct Detection Device. Microscopy and Microanalysis, 2014;20(3):706-714. Microscopy and Microanalysis can be contacted at: Cambridge Univ Press, 32 Avenue Of The Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, USA. (Cambridge University Press - www.cambridge.org; Microscopy and Microanalysis - journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=MAM)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R. Ramachandra, University of California, Natl Center Microscopy & Imaging Res, Center Res Biol Syst, La Jolla, CA 92093, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.C. Bouwer, M.R. Mackey, E. Bushong, S.T. Peltier, N.H. Xuong and M.H. Ellisman.

Keywords for this news article include: La Jolla, California, Microscopy, United States, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Energy Weekly News


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters