News Column

Studies from La Plata National University Yield New Data on Flavins (Combined Experimental and Computational Investigation of the Fluorescence...

August 19, 2014



Studies from La Plata National University Yield New Data on Flavins (Combined Experimental and Computational Investigation of the Fluorescence Quenching of Riboflavin by Cinnamic Alcohol Chemisorbed on Silica Nanoparticles)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Current study results on Biological Factors have been published. According to news reporting originating in Buenos Aires, Argentina, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is usually present in water courses, lakes, and seas and acts as a photosensitizer in the photo-oxidation of a range of contaminants. However, little is known about the interaction of this compound with aromatics sorbed on silica sediments or on suspended silica particles."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from La Plata National University, "This article describes the modification and characterization of silica nanoparticles by condensation of the silanol groups of the particles with E-cinnamic alcohol. The reaction was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), solid-state C-13 and Si-29 cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR, reduction of the specific surface area measured by BET, thermal analysis, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Toxicity to the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri of the modified particles was also measured. Riboflavin fluorescence was quenched in aqueous medium in the presence of dissolved E-cinnamic alcohol or in suspensions of the modified particles. The results are interpreted in terms of formation of 1:1 complexes between the ground states of riboflavin and the free or adsorbed cinnamic alcohol."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Density functional theory (DFT) calculations in aqueous medium support the existence of the complex and explain the observed quenching of riboflavin fluorescence upon addition of cinnamic alcohol without affecting the emission maximum of riboflavin."

For more information on this research see: Combined Experimental and Computational Investigation of the Fluorescence Quenching of Riboflavin by Cinnamic Alcohol Chemisorbed on Silica Nanoparticles. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 2014;118(28):15348-15355. Journal of Physical Chemistry C can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Journal of Physical Chemistry C - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/jpccck)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting V.B. Arce, La Plata National University, Fac Ciencias Exactas, Center Quim Inorgan, RA-1900 La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Additional authors for this research include J. Scotto, P.E. Allegretti, M.A. Melo, C. Airoldi, M.L. Salum, R. Erra-Balsells, R.P. Diez and D.O. Martire (see also Biological Factors).

Keywords for this news article include: Argentina, Riboflavin, Buenos Aires, Nanoparticle, South America, Nanotechnology, Biological Factors, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Life Science Weekly


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters