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Researchers' Work from Auburn University Focuses on Sulfur Compounds (Aggregation and Precipitation of Gold Nanoparticle Clusters in Carbon...

August 19, 2014



Researchers' Work from Auburn University Focuses on Sulfur Compounds (Aggregation and Precipitation of Gold Nanoparticle Clusters in Carbon Dioxide-Gas-Expanded Liquid Dimethyl Sulfoxide)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Sulfur Compounds are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating from Auburn, Alabama, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Previous post-synthesis nanoparticle processing techniques have demonstrated that carbon dioxide (CO2)-gas-expanded liquids can be used as a tool to controllably induce nanoparticle precipitation and size-selective fractionation. Until now, these previous studies have been limited to using nonpolar solvents (e.g., hexane) in CO2-gas-expanded liquids as a method to control nanoparticle precipitation by exploiting subtle changes in dispersive forces."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Auburn University, "We demonstrate a facile, post-synthesis nanoparticle processing technique to controllably aggregate gold (Au) nanoparticles into supraparticle clusters using CO2-gas-expanded dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a polar, aprotic solvent, as well as the subsequent ability to precipitate these Au nanoparticle clusters from the DMSO solvent media at moderate applied CO2 pressures. Dispersions of Au nanoparticles have been prepared in three different DMSO solutions (where DMSO can serve as both the solvent and a stabilizing ligand): (i) neat DMSO, (ii) DMSO + oleic acid, and (iii) DMSO + stearic acid. UV-vis spectroscopy was used to monitor the surface plasmon resonance band of the Au nanoparticle dispersions where it was determined that the post-synthesis aggregation of the Au nanoparticles in DMSO is a direct function of the applied CO2 pressure. Furthermore, it was observed that the subsequent precipitation of the Au nanoparticle clusters in DMSO was induced by the applied CO2 pressure whereby the Au nanoparticle clusters would precipitate as a function of time (at a specified pressure)."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These findings illustrate the markedly different dispersibility of nanoparticles in CO2-gas-expanded nonpolar and polar solvent systems."

For more information on this research see: Aggregation and Precipitation of Gold Nanoparticle Clusters in Carbon Dioxide-Gas-Expanded Liquid Dimethyl Sulfoxide. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 2014;118(26):14595-14605. Journal of Physical Chemistry C can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Journal of Physical Chemistry C - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/jpccck)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J.N. Duggan, Auburn University, Dept. of Chem Engn, Shelby Center 1301, Auburn, AL 36849, United States (see also Sulfur Compounds).

Keywords for this news article include: Auburn, Alabama, Chemicals, Chemistry, United States, Carbon Dioxide, Nanotechnology, Sulfur Compounds, Dimethyl Sulfoxide, Gold Nanoparticles, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America, Inorganic Carbon Compounds

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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