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Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Illuminating Apparatus Using Semiconductor Light Emitting Elements", for Approval

August 20, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Electronics Newsweekly -- From Washington, D.C., VerticalNews journalists report that a patent application by the inventors Shin, Sang Hyun (Gyeonggi-do, KR); Jung, Dae Yun (Gyeonggi-do, KR), filed on January 29, 2014, was made available online on August 7, 2014.

The patent's assignee is Wooree Lighting Co., Ltd.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "This section provides background information related to the present disclosure which is not necessarily prior art.

"FIG. 1 is a view illustrating an example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power, which includes an AC power source 100, a resistor 110 for regulating the voltage from the AC power source 100, and parallely connected LEDs 120 and 130 of opposite polarity. When a positive current flows, the LED 120 emits light; when a negative current flow, the LED 130 emits light.

"FIG. 2 is a view illustrating another example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power, in which a light emitting apparatus 200 includes a rectifier 210, a regulator 220 and a light emitting part 230. An alternating current is converted to a pulsating current through the rectifier 210 and then a direct current through the regulator 220 before it is fed to the light emitting part 230.

"FIG. 3 is a view illustrating yet another example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power, which includes a switching mode power supply 320 (SMPS) having a transformer, an LED array 330 formed of a plurality of serially connected light emitting diodes. When the SMPS 320 is used, however, an electromagnetic interference 350 (EMI) is additionally required.

"FIG. 4 is a view illustrating yet another example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power, which has a waveform as depicted in FIG. 5. Here, a light emitting device 400 includes a rectifier 410, and a plurality of serially connected LEDs 420 adapted to an input voltage. After the voltage goes through the rectifier 410, its waveform changes to one as shown in FIG. 5. The plurality of LEDs 420 is turned on or radiates light only after the voltage reaches a T.sub.ov where all of the LEDs can be in a conductive state, and their lights go out when the voltage falls below T.sub.ov (e.g. T.sub.o.phi..phi.). Therefore, although such a simplified configuration for the circuitry can be advantageous, there is a problem that the device cannot take an advantage of the full cycles of AC power.

"FIG. 6 and FIG. 7 illustrate an example of a semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power, as suggested in U.S. published patent application No. 2010-0194298. To resolve the problem mentioned above, a light emitting device 600 includes a rectifier 610, a controller 620 for controlling serially connected LEDs by dividing them into a plurality of groups 631, 632, 633, 634 and 634. The controller 620 has switches Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4, Q5 and Q6, controlling the light radiation of the groups 631, 632, 633, 634 and 635, respectively. When the rectified current voltage reaches a time T.sub.1 and a voltage of 20V where the LED group 631 can be turned on, the switch Q1 remains in the ON position such that the current flowing through the LED group 631 is conducted with the switch Q1, and the LED group 631 radiates light at a voltage between 20V and 40V. At a time T2 and a voltage of 40V where the LED group 631 and the LED group 632 can be turned on, the switch Q1 is put in its OFF position while the switch Q2 remains in its ON position such that the current flowing through the LED group 631 and the LED group 632 is conducted with the switch Q1, and the LED group 631 radiates light at a voltage between 40V and 60V. In a similar way, the other LED groups up to the LED group 635 are lit up. Meanwhile, when a voltage is lowered, the LED group lights are dimmed down in sequence by turning the switches to the ON/OFF position. Even though the light emitting device of this example takes an advantage of using all of the rectified current for light radiation by LED groups, it has a problem that LED properties can change by time because while the LED group 631 radiates light across the full cycle, the LED group 635 radiates light only in an interval of the highest voltage."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, VerticalNews correspondents also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "The problems to be solved by the present disclosure will be described in the latter part of the best mode for carrying out the invention.

"This section provides a general summary of the disclosure and is not a comprehensive disclosure of its full scope or all of its features.

"According to an aspect of the present disclosure, there is provided an illuminating apparatus using semiconductor light emitting elements of which the brightness is controlled by a dimmer comprising: n LED groups (n.gtoreq.2) which are serially connected, each being capable of radiating light in a half cycle of an AC input voltage and including a first LED of a first color temperature or a second LED of a second color temperature higher than the first color temperature, wherein, in a current flow path, a first LED group of the n LED groups includes the first LED; and a set of switches including at least one bypass switch located between the p-th LED group (1.ltoreq.p
"The advantageous effects of the present disclosure will be described in the latter part of the best mode for carrying out the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

"FIG. 1 is a view illustrating an example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power.

"FIG. 2 is a view illustrating another example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power.

"FIG. 3 is a view illustrating yet another example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power.

"FIG. 4 and FIG. 5 illustrate yet another example of a conventional semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power and a voltage waveform thereof.

"FIG. 6 and FIG. 7 illustrate an example of a semiconductor LED lighting apparatus using AC power, as suggested in US published patent application No. 2010-0194298.

"FIG. 8 is a view illustrating an example of an illuminating apparatus using semiconductor light emitting elements according to the present disclosure.

"FIG. 9 is a graph showing an ON/OFF state in each interval depending on an input voltage to an illuminating apparatus using semiconductor light emitting elements according to the present disclosure.

"FIG. 10 is a view illustrating an example of an LED array configuration for an illuminating apparatus using semiconductor light emitting elements according to the present disclosure.

"FIG. 11 is a view illustrating another example of an LED array configuration for an illuminating apparatus using semiconductor light emitting elements according to the present disclosure.

"FIG. 12 is a view illustrating yet another example of an LED array configuration for an illuminating apparatus using semiconductor light emitting elements according to the present disclosure."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Shin, Sang Hyun; Jung, Dae Yun. Illuminating Apparatus Using Semiconductor Light Emitting Elements. Filed January 29, 2014 and posted August 7, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=5310&p=107&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140731.PD.&OS=PD/20140731&RS=PD/20140731

Keywords for this news article include: Electronics, Semiconductor, Wooree Lighting Co. Ltd.

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Source: Electronics Newsweekly


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