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Researchers from Natural History Museum Describe Findings in Life Science Research (Baltorussus total makeover: rejuvenation and sex change in an...

August 19, 2014



Researchers from Natural History Museum Describe Findings in Life Science Research (Baltorussus total makeover: rejuvenation and sex change in an ancient parasitoid wasp lineage)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Research findings on Life Science Research are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting from Copenhagen, Denmark, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The Orussidae is a small and rare but phylogenetically important family of parasitoid wasps. The fossil record of the family is also very poor."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from Natural History Museum, "Baltorussus velteni was described from Baltic amber from an allegedly female specimen. This and another recently discovered specimen are examined with microCT scanning and standard microscopy. We reveal that both the holotype and the new specimen are actually males. Furthermore, the results of the microCT scanning allow us to integrate the fossils in a morphological data set assembled for extant Orussidae. Phylogenetic analyses consistently retrieve Baltorussus as a separate basal lineage within the crown group, whereas two Cretaceous fossils are placed as stem group orussids and a Dominican amber fossil in an extant genus. Based on the positions of the fossils, we estimate that the extant Orussidae radiated in the mid-Cretaceous (approx. 100 Ma ago)."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This is considerably younger than a previously suggested Early Jurassic date (180 Ma ago), which was primarily based on biogeographic evidence."

For more information on this research see: Baltorussus total makeover: rejuvenation and sex change in an ancient parasitoid wasp lineage. Plos One, 2014;9(6):e98412. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting L. Vilhelmsen, Biosystematics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Denmark, Copenhagen, Life Science Research.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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