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Researchers from Dresden University of Technology Report Findings in Biomedical Optics (Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman...

August 20, 2014



Researchers from Dresden University of Technology Report Findings in Biomedical Optics (Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images of brain)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Biotechnology have been published. According to news reporting originating from Dresden, Germany, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is an emerging multiphoton technique for the label-free histopathology of the central nervous system, by imaging the lipid content within the tissue. In order to apply the technique on standard histology sections, it is important to know the effects of tissue fixation on the CARS image."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Dresden University of Technology, "Here, we report the effects of two common fixation methods, namely with formalin and methanol-acetone, on mouse brain and human glioblastoma tissue. The variations induced by fixation on the CARS contrast and intensity were compared and interpreted using Raman microspectroscopy. The results show that, whenever unfixed cryosections cannot be used, fixation with formalin constitutes an alternative which does not deteriorate substantially the contrast generated by the different brain structures in the CARS image."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Fixation with methanol-acetone strongly modifies the tissue lipid content and is therefore incompatible with the CARS imaging."

For more information on this research see: Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images of brain. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 2014;19(7):071402 (see also Biotechnology).

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R. Galli, Dresden University of Technology, Clinical Sensing and Monitoring, Faculty of Medicine, Fetscherstrasse 74, D-01307 Dresden, Germany. Additional authors for this research include O. Uckermann, E. Koch, G. Schackert, M. Kirsch and G. Steiner.

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Europe, Dresden, Germany.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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