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Researchers from CNRS Report Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Life Science Research (Automated high-throughput quantification of...

August 19, 2014



Researchers from CNRS Report Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Life Science Research (Automated high-throughput quantification of mitotic spindle positioning from DIC movies of Caenorhabditis embryos)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- New research on Life Science Research is the subject of a report. According to news reporting out of Lyon, France, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The mitotic spindle is a microtubule-based structure that elongates to accurately segregate chromosomes during anaphase. Its position within the cell also dictates the future cell cleavage plan, thereby determining daughter cell orientation within a tissue or cell fate adoption for polarized cells."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from CNRS, "Therefore, the mitotic spindle ensures at the same time proper cell division and developmental precision. Consequently, spindle dynamics is the matter of intensive research. Among the different cellular models that have been explored, the one-cell stage C. elegans embryo has been an essential and powerful system to dissect the molecular and biophysical basis of spindle elongation and positioning. Indeed, in this large and transparent cell, spindle poles (or centrosomes) can be easily detected from simple DIC microscopy by human eyes. To perform quantitative and high-throughput analysis of spindle motion, we developed a computer program ACT for Automated-Centrosome-Tracking from DIC movies of C. elegans embryos. We therefore offer an alternative to the image acquisition and processing of transgenic lines expressing fluorescent spindle markers. Consequently, experiments on large sets of cells can be performed with a simple setup using inexpensive microscopes. Moreover, analysis of any mutant or wild-type backgrounds is accessible because laborious rounds of crosses with transgenic lines become unnecessary. Last, our program allows spindle detection in other nematode species, offering the same quality of DIC images but for which techniques of transgenesis are not accessible. Thus, our program also opens the way towards a quantitative evolutionary approach of spindle dynamics. Overall, our computer program is a unique macro for the image-and movie-processing platform ImageJ. It is user-friendly and freely available under an open-source licence. ACT allows batch-wise analysis of large sets of mitosis events."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Within 2 minutes, a single movie is processed and the accuracy of the automated tracking matches the precision of the human eye."

For more information on this research see: Automated high-throughput quantification of mitotic spindle positioning from DIC movies of Caenorhabditis embryos. Plos One, 2014;9(4):e93718. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D. Cluet, Laboratory of Molecular Biology of the Cell, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Lyon, France. Additional authors for this research include P.N. Stebe, S. Riche, M. Spichty and M. Delattre (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Lyon, France, Europe, Life Science Research.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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