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Research Data from Kobe University Update Understanding of Ethanol (Time-based comparative transcriptomics in engineered xylose-utilizing...

August 20, 2014



Research Data from Kobe University Update Understanding of Ethanol (Time-based comparative transcriptomics in engineered xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies temperature-responsive genes during ethanol production)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Fresh data on Ethanol are presented in a new report. According to news reporting out of Kobe, Japan, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Agricultural residues comprising lignocellulosic materials are excellent sources of pentose sugar, which can be converted to ethanol as fuel. Ethanol production via consolidated bioprocessing requires a suitable microorganism to withstand the harsh fermentation environment of high temperature, high ethanol concentration, and exposure to inhibitors."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Kobe University, "We genetically enhanced an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, sun049, enabling it to uptake xylose as the sole carbon source at high fermentation temperature. This strain was able to produce 13.9 g/l ethanol from 50 g/l xylose at 38 C. To better understand the xylose consumption ability during long-term, high-temperature conditions, we compared by transcriptomics two fermentation conditions: high temperature (38 C) and control temperature (30 C) during the first 12 h of fermentation. This is the first long-term, time-based transcriptomics approach, and it allowed us to discover the role of heat-responsive genes when xylose is the sole carbon source. The results suggest that genes related to amino acid, cell wall, and ribosomal protein synthesis are down-regulated under heat stress. To allow cell stability and continuous xylose uptake in order to produce ethanol, hexose transporter HXT5, heat shock proteins, ubiquitin proteins, and proteolysis were all induced at high temperature."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "We also speculate that the strong relationship between high temperature and increased xylitol accumulation represents the cell's mechanism to protect itself from heat degradation."

For more information on this research see: Time-based comparative transcriptomics in engineered xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies temperature-responsive genes during ethanol production. Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology, 2013;40(9):1039-50. Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology can be contacted at: Nature Publishing Group, 345 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10010-1707, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology - www.springerlink.com/content/1367-5435/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K.S. Ismail, Dept. of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe, 657-8501, Japan. Additional authors for this research include T. Sakamoto, T. Hasunuma and A. Kondo (see also Ethanol).

Publisher contact information for the Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology is: Nature Publishing Group, 345 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10010-1707, USA.

Keywords for this news article include: Kobe, Asia, Japan, Alcohols, Engineering, Ethanolamines, Life Sciences, Saccharomycetales, Saccharomycetaceae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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