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Reports Outline Stem Cells Findings from New York University (In Vitro Characterization of a Stem-Cell-Seeded Triple-Interpenetrating-Network...

August 20, 2014



Reports Outline Stem Cells Findings from New York University (In Vitro Characterization of a Stem-Cell-Seeded Triple-Interpenetrating-Network Hydrogel for Functional Regeneration of the Nucleus Pulposus)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Stem Cell Research. According to news originating from New York City, New York, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Intervertebral disc degeneration is implicated as a major cause of low-back pain. There is a pressing need for new regenerative therapies for disc degeneration that restore native tissue structure and mechanical function."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from New York University, "To that end we investigated the therapeutic potential of an injectable, triple-interpenetrating-network hydrogel comprised of dextran, chitosan, and teleostean, for functional regeneration of the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the intervertebral disc in a series of biomechanical, cytotoxicity, and tissue engineering studies. Biomechanical properties were evaluated as a function of gelation time, with the hydrogel reaching similar to 90% of steady-state aggregate modulus within 10 h. Hydrogel mechanical properties evaluated in confined and unconfined compression were comparable to native human NP properties. To confirm containment within the disc under physiological loading, toluidine-blue-labeled hydrogel was injected into human cadaveric spine segments after creation of a nucleotomy defect, and the segments were subjected to 10,000 cycles of loading. Gross analysis demonstrated no implant extrusion, and further, that the hydrogel interdigitated well with native NP. Constructs were next surface-seeded with NP cells and cultured for 14 days, confirming lack of hydrogel cytotoxicity, with the hydrogel maintaining NP cell viability and promoting proliferation. Next, to evaluate the potential of the hydrogel to support cell-mediated matrix production, constructs were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultured under prochondrogenic conditions for up to 42 days. Importantly, the hydrogel maintained MSC viability and promoted proliferation, as evidenced by increasing DNA content with culture duration. MSCs differentiated along a chondrogenic lineage, evidenced by upregulation of aggrecan and collagen II mRNA, and increased GAG and collagen content, and mechanical properties with increasing culture duration. Collectively, these results establish the therapeutic potential of this novel hydrogel for functional regeneration of the NP."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Future work will confirm the ability of this hydrogel to normalize the mechanical stability of cadaveric human motion segments, and advance the material toward human translation using preclinical large-animal models."

For more information on this research see: In Vitro Characterization of a Stem-Cell-Seeded Triple-Interpenetrating-Network Hydrogel for Functional Regeneration of the Nucleus Pulposus. Tissue Engineering Part A, 2014;20(13-14):1841-1849. Tissue Engineering Part A can be contacted at: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc, 140 Huguenot Street, 3RD Fl, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA (see also Stem Cell Research).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from L.J. Smith, New York University, Dept. of Surg, Sch Med, New York, NY 10016, United States. Additional authors for this research include D.J. Gorth, B.L. Showalter, J.A. Chiaro, E.E. Beattie, D.M. Elliott, R.L. Mauck, W. Chen and N.R. Malhotra.

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Alcohols, Hydrogel, New York City, United States, Organic Chemicals, Stem Cell Research, Polyethylene Glycols, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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