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Reports from University of Edinburgh Describe Recent Advances in Botany (Glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides from Rosa cell cultures are...

August 19, 2014



Reports from University of Edinburgh Describe Recent Advances in Botany (Glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides from Rosa cell cultures are boron-bridged in the plasma membrane and form complexes with rhamnogalacturonan II)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- A new study on Life Science Research is now available. According to news reporting originating in Edinburgh, United Kingdom, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Boron (B) is essential for plant cell-wall structure and membrane functions. Compared with its role in cross-linking the pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), little information is known about the biological role of B in membranes."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Edinburgh, "Here, we investigated the involvement of glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs), major components of lipid rafts, in the membrane requirement for B. Using thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, we first characterized GIPCs from Rosa cell culture. The major GIPC has one hexose residue, one hexuronic acid residue, inositol phosphate, and a ceramide moiety with a C-18 trihydroxylated mono-unsaturated long-chain base and a C-24 monohydroxylated saturated fatty acid. Disrupting B bridging (by B starvation in vivo or by treatment with cold dilute HCl or with excess borate in vitro) enhanced the GIPCs' extractability. As RG-II is the main B-binding site in plants, we investigated whether it could form a B-centred complex with GIPCs. Using high-voltage paper electrophoresis, we showed that addition of GIPCs decreased the electrophoretic mobility of radiolabelled RG-II, suggesting formation of a GIPC-B-RG-II complex. Last, using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we showed that added GIPCs facilitate RG-II dimerization in vitro."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "B plays a structural role in the plasma membrane. The disruption of membrane components by high borate may account for the phytotoxicity of excess B. Moreover, the in-vitro formation of a GIPC-B-RG-II complex gives the first molecular explanation of the wall-membrane attachment sites observed in vivo. Finally, our results suggest a role for GIPCs in the RG-II dimerization process."

For more information on this research see: Glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides from Rosa cell cultures are boron-bridged in the plasma membrane and form complexes with rhamnogalacturonan II. Plant Journal, 2014;79(1):139-149. Plant Journal can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Plant Journal - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-313X)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A. Voxeur, University of Edinburgh, Inst Mol Plant Sci, Edinburgh Cell Wall Grp, Edinburgh EH9 3JH, Midlothian, United Kingdom (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, Life Science Research

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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