News Column

Patent Issued for Stability Region for a User Interface

August 21, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Computer Weekly News -- Google Inc. (Mountain View, CA) has been issued patent number 8799810, according to news reporting originating out of Alexandria, Virginia, by VerticalNews editors.

The patent's inventor is Wheeler, Aaron Joseph (San Francisco, CA).

This patent was filed on March 16, 2012 and was published online on August 5, 2014.

From the background information supplied by the inventors, news correspondents obtained the following quote: "Unless otherwise indicated herein, the materials described in this section are not prior art to the claims in this application and are not admitted to be prior art by inclusion in this section.

"Computing devices such as personal computers, laptop computers, tablet computers, cellular phones, and countless types of Internet-capable devices are increasingly prevalent in numerous aspects of modern life. Over time, the manner in which these devices are providing information to users is becoming more intelligent, more efficient, more intuitive, and/or less obtrusive.

"The trend toward miniaturization of computing hardware and peripherals, as well as of sensors, detectors, and image and audio processors, among other technologies, has helped open up a field sometimes referred to as 'wearable computing.' In the area of image and visual processing and production, in particular, it has become possible to consider wearable displays that place a very small image display element close enough to a wearer's (or user's) eye(s) such that the displayed image fills or nearly fills the user's field of vision, and appears as a normal sized image, such as might be displayed on a traditional image display-device. Such technology may be referred to as 'near-eye displays.'

"Near-eye displays, also sometimes called 'head-mounted displays' (HMDs), are fundamental components of wearable display-devices. A head-mounted display-device places one or more graphic displays close to a wearer's eye or eyes. A wearable computer processing system may generate the images on a display. Further, head-mounted display-devices may be as small as a pair of glasses or as large as a helmet.

"Emerging and anticipated uses of wearable display-devices include applications in which users interact in real time with an augmented or virtual reality. Such applications can be mission-critical or safety-critical, such as in a public safety or aviation setting. The applications can also be recreational, such as interactive gaming."

Supplementing the background information on this patent, VerticalNews reporters also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent: "In one aspect, an exemplary method provides for controlled movement of a viewing window across a graphical user-interface (GUI). Such an exemplary method involves causing a display-device to display the viewing window, in which the viewing window provides a view of a portion of the GUI. Also, the method involves programmatically establishing a stability region at a default position with respect to the viewing window. Change in physical orientation of the display-device is detected and, in accordance with the detected change in physical orientation, (i) the stability region is moved with respect to the viewing window and (ii) the viewing window is moved with respect to the GUI at a first movement rate. The exemplary method further involves determining that the stability region has moved at least a predefined non-zero distance from the default position. In response to determining that the first stability region has moved at least the predefined non-zero distance from the default position, the exemplary method involves moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI at a second movement rate in accordance with continued change in physical orientation of the display-device. Also, a threshold reduction of the continued change in physical orientation of the display-device is detected; and at least in response to detecting the threshold reduction of the continued change in physical orientation of the display-device, the viewing window is again moved with respect to the GUI at the first movement rate.

"In another aspect, an exemplary method for controlled movement of a viewing window across a GUI involves causing a display-device to display the viewing window, wherein the viewing window provides a view of a portion of the GUI. Change in physical orientation of the display-device is also detected and the viewing window is moved with respect to the GUI in accordance with the detected change in physical orientation of the display-device. Next, the method involves detecting threshold reduction of the change in physical orientation of the display-device. Then, at least in response to detecting the threshold reduction of the change in physical orientation of the display-device, the method involves stopping the movement of the viewing window with respect to the GUI and programmatically establishing a stability region at a default position with respect to the viewing window. The exemplary method then involves moving the stability region with respect to the viewing window in accordance with continued change in physical orientation of the display-device, without moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI. Further, the method involves determining that the stability region has moved at least a predefined non-zero distance from the default position and, in response to determining that the stability region has moved at least the predefined non-zero distance from the default position, moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI in accordance with the continued change in physical orientation of the display-device.

"In yet another aspect, an exemplary method for controlled movement of a viewing window across a GUI involves causing a display-device to display the viewing window, wherein the viewing window shows a portion of the GUI, and programmatically establishing in the viewing window (i) a reticle at a default position with respect to the viewing window and (ii) a first stability region, wherein the reticle at the default position is encompassed by the first stability region. This exemplary method also involves detecting change in physical orientation of the display-device and, in accordance with the detected change in physical orientation, moving the reticle with respect to the viewing window and (ii) moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI at a first movement rate. The method additionally involves determining that the reticle has thereby moved outside of the stability region. In response to determining that the reticle has moved outside of the stability region, the method involves moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI at a second movement rate, in accordance with continued change in physical orientation of the display-device. The method further involves detecting a threshold reduction of the continued change in physical orientation of the display-device and, at least in response to detecting the threshold reduction of the continued change in physical orientation of the display-device, moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI at the first movement rate.

"In a further aspect, an exemplary non-transitory computer-readable medium has instructions stored therein, which are executable by a processor to cause a display-device to perform functions for controlled movement of a viewing window across a GUI. The functions include displaying the viewing window, wherein the viewing window defines a displayed portion of the GUI; programmatically establishing at a default position with respect to the viewing window a first stability region; and detecting change in physical orientation of the display-device. The functions also include moving the first stability region with respect to the viewing window in accordance with the detected change in physical orientation of the display-device and moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI at a first movement rate. Further, the functions include determining that the first stability region has thereby moved at least a predefined non-zero distance from the default position and, in response to determining that the first stability region has moved at least the predefined non-zero distance from the default position, moving the viewing window with respect to the GUI at a second movement rate in accordance with continued change in physical orientation of the display-device. Moreover, the instructions are also executable to cause the display-device to (i) detect a threshold reduction of the continued change in physical orientation of the display-device and (ii) in response to at least detecting the threshold reduction of the continued change in physical orientation of the display-device, move the viewing window with respect to the GUI at the first movement rate.

"These as well as other aspects, advantages, and alternatives will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art by reading the following detailed description, with reference where appropriate to the accompanying drawings."

For the URL and additional information on this patent, see: Wheeler, Aaron Joseph. Stability Region for a User Interface. U.S. Patent Number 8799810, filed March 16, 2012, and published online on August 5, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8799810.PN.&OS=PN/8799810RS=PN/8799810

Keywords for this news article include: Google Inc.

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Source: Computer Weekly News


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