News Column

Patent Issued for Method and Apparatus for Adjusting Cardiac Event Detection Threshold Based on Dynamic Noise Estimation

August 18, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cardiovascular Week -- Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc. (St. Paul, MN) has been issued patent number 8798742, according to news reporting originating out of Alexandria, Virginia, by NewsRx editors (see also Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.).

The patent's inventors are Linder, William J. (Golden Valley, MN); Maniak, Jeremy (Columbia Heights, MN); Balczewski, Ron A. (Bloomington, MN).

This patent was filed on March 31, 2009 and was published online on August 5, 2014.

From the background information supplied by the inventors, news correspondents obtained the following quote: "The heart is the center of a person's circulatory system. It includes an electro-mechanical system performing two major pumping functions. The left portions of the heart draw oxygenated blood from the lungs and pump it to the organs of the body to provide the organs with their metabolic needs for oxygen. The right portions of the heart draw deoxygenated blood from the organs and pump it into the lungs where the blood gets oxygenated. In a normal heart, the sinoatrial node, the heart's natural pacemaker, generates electrical impulses, known as action potentials, that propagate through an electrical conduction system to various regions of the heart to cause the depolarization of the electrical conduction system and excitation of myocardial tissues in these regions. Coordinated delays in the propagations of the electrical impulses in a normal electrical conduction system cause the various regions of the heart to contract in synchrony such that the pumping functions are performed efficiently. Arrhythmia occurs, for example, when the sinoatrial node fails to generate the electrical impulses at a normal rate, when electrical impulses are generated from a pathological origin, and/or when pathological changes occur to the electrical conduction system. Arrhythmia causes the heart to contract at a rhythm that is too slow, too fast, or irregular. Consequently, the heart's pumping efficiency is reduced, and hence, the blood flow to the body is diminished.

"Implantable CRM devices are used to treat arrhythmias by delivering electrical pulses to the patient's heart. In one example, pacing pulses are delivered to one or more regions of the heart to at least partially restore the function of the sinoatrial node and/or the electrical conduction system. According to many pacing algorithms, a pacing pulse is delivered on demand, i.e., when a corresponding intrinsic depolarization is absent or abnormally delayed. In another example, a defibrillation pulse is delivered to the heart to stop a rhythm that is too fast and/or irregular. This requires detection of a depolarization rate and/or pattern that warrant a delivery of the defibrillation pulse. Thus, the detection of cardiac electrical events including depolarizations is important in both pacing and defibrillation therapies.

"The cardiac depolarizations are detected from one or more cardiac signals each sensed with at least one electrode placed in or on the heart. In addition to cardiac depolarizations, noises of various types are often present in such cardiac signals. The sources of such noises include, but not limited to, non-cardiac bioelectric activities such as myoelectrical signals associated with breathing and/or bodily movements and interference from nearby electrical power lines, equipment, and appliances. An implantable CRM device detects a cardiac depolarization when the amplitude of a cardiac signal exceeds a detection threshold. When the threshold is set low, the noises may cause over-sensing, i.e., the implantable CRM device detects noise as cardiac depolarizations. Consequently, the implantable CRM device fails to deliver pacing pulses when needed and/or delivers a defibrillation pulse that is not needed. When the threshold is set high to avoid detection of noise, under-sensing may occur, i.e., the implantable CRM device fails to detect cardiac depolarizations. Consequently, the implantable CRM device delivers of pacing pulses that are not needed or not properly timed based to the heart's intrinsic activities and/or fails to deliver a defibrillation pulse when fibrillation occurs. Depending on the type of therapy, over-sensing and under-sensing both have consequences ranging from inefficient therapy to death. For example, the consequence of a failure to deliver a defibrillation pulse may be fatal, while the consequence of a delivering an unnecessary defibrillation pulse causes significant discomfort to the patient and shortens the life expectancy of the implantable CRM device. For these and other reasons, there is a need to provide an acceptably accurate detection of cardiac electrical events in the presence of noise."

Supplementing the background information on this patent, NewsRx reporters also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "An implantable CRM device includes a sensing and detection circuit that senses at least one cardiac signal and detects cardiac electrical events from the sensed cardiac signal using a detection threshold that is adjusted based on dynamic noise estimation. The sensed cardiac signal is filtered to produce a filtered cardiac signal having a signal frequency band and a noise signal having a noise frequency band. The noise frequency band is substantially different from the signal frequency band. A dynamic noise floor is produced based on the noise signal and used as the minimum value for the detection threshold. A cardiac electrical is detected when the amplitude of the filtered cardiac signal exceeds the detection threshold.

"In one embodiment, a cardiac sensing system includes a sensing circuit, a noise estimation circuit, and an event detection circuit. The sensing circuit senses a cardiac signal and includes a signal filter to produce a filtered cardiac signal based on the cardiac signal. The filtered cardiac signal has a signal frequency band. The noise estimation circuit includes a noise filter and a noise floor generator. The noise filter produces a noise signal based on the cardiac signal. The noise signal has a noise frequency band that is substantially different from the signal frequency band. The noise floor generator produces a dynamic noise floor based on the noise signal. The event detection circuit includes a threshold circuit and a comparator. The threshold circuit dynamically produces a detection threshold based on at least the amplitude of the filtered cardiac signal and the dynamic noise floor. The comparator compares the filtered cardiac signal to a detection threshold and indicates a detection of a cardiac electrical event when the amplitude of the filtered cardiac signal exceeds the detection threshold.

"In one embodiment, an implantable CRM device includes one or more sensing channels, a therapy output circuit, and an implant control circuit, contained in an implantable housing. Each sensing channels includes a circuit of the cardiac sensing system. The therapy output circuit delivers one or more cardiac therapies. The implant control circuit controls the delivery of the one or more cardiac therapies in response to one or more cardiac electrical events detected by the one or more sensing channels.

"In one embodiment, a method for detecting cardiac electrical events is provided. A cardiac signal is sensed. The cardiac signal is filtered to produce a filtered cardiac signal for detecting the cardiac electrical events in a signal frequency band and also filtered to produce a noise signal for measuring a noise level in a noise frequency band. A dynamic noise floor is produced based on the noise signal. A dynamic detection threshold is produced based on the amplitude of the filtered cardiac signal and the dynamic noise floor. Cardiac electrical events are detected by comparing the amplitude of the filtered cardiac signal to the dynamic detection threshold.

"This Summary is an overview of some of the teachings of the present application and not intended to be an exclusive or exhaustive treatment of the present subject matter. Further details about the present subject matter are found in the detailed description and appended claims. Other aspects of the invention will be apparent to persons skilled in the art upon reading and understanding the following detailed description and viewing the drawings that form a part thereof, each of which are not to be taken in a limiting sense. The scope of the present invention is defined by the appended claims and their equivalents."

For the URL and additional information on this patent, see: Linder, William J.; Maniak, Jeremy; Balczewski, Ron A.. Method and Apparatus for Adjusting Cardiac Event Detection Threshold Based on Dynamic Noise Estimation. U.S. Patent Number 8798742, filed March 31, 2009, and published online on August 5, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8798742.PN.&OS=PN/8798742RS=PN/8798742

Keywords for this news article include: Therapy, Cardiology, Cardiac Pacemakers Inc..

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Cardiovascular Week


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters