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New Nanoparticles Findings from University of Texas Described [Just getting into cells is not enough: mechanisms underlying 4-(N)-stearoyl...

August 20, 2014



New Nanoparticles Findings from University of Texas Described [Just getting into cells is not enough: mechanisms underlying 4-(N)-stearoyl gemcitabine solid lipid nanoparticle's ability to overcome gemcitabine resistance caused by RRM1 ...]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Fresh data on Nanoparticles are presented in a new report. According to news reporting from Austin, Texas, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Gemcitabine is a deoxycytidine analog that is widely used in the chemotherapy of many solid tumors. However, acquired tumor cell resistance often limits its use."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of Texas, "Previously, we discovered that 4-(N)-stearoyl gemcitabine solid lipid nanoparticles (4-(N)-GemC18-SLNs) can overcome multiple acquired gemcitabine resistance mechanisms, including RRM1 overexpression. The present study was designed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the 4-(N)-GemC18-SLNs' ability to overcome gemcitabine resistance. The 4-(N)-GemC18 in the 4-(N)-GemC18-SLNs entered tumor cells due to clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the 4-(N)-GemC18-SLNs into the lysosomes of the cells, whereas the 4-(N)-GemC18 alone in solution entered cells by diffusion. We substantiated that it is the way the 4-(N)-GemC18-SLNs deliver the 4-(N)-GemC18 into tumor cells that allows the gemcitabine hydrolyzed from the 4-(N)-GemC18 to be more efficiently converted into its active metabolite, gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP), and thus more potent against gemcitabine-resistant tumor cells than 4-(N)-GemC18 or gemcitabine alone. Moreover, we also showed that the RRM1-overexpressing tumor cells were also cross-resistant to cytarabine, another nucleoside analog commonly used in cancer therapy, and 4-(N)-stearoyl cytarabine carried by solid lipid nanoparticles can also overcome the resistance."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Therefore, formulating the long-chain fatty acid amide derivatives of nucleoside analogs into solid lipid nanoparticles may represent a platform technology to increase the antitumor activity of the nucleoside analogs and to overcome tumor cell resistance to them."

For more information on this research see: Just getting into cells is not enough: mechanisms underlying 4-(N)-stearoyl gemcitabine solid lipid nanoparticle's ability to overcome gemcitabine resistance caused by RRM1 overexpression. Journal of Controlled Release, 2013;169(1-2):17-27. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Journal of Controlled Release - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/502690)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting P. Wonganan, Pharmaceutics Division, The University of Texas at Austin, College of Pharmacy, Austin, TX 78712, United States. Additional authors for this research include D.S. Lansakara-P, S. Zhu, M. Holzer, M.A. Sandoval, M. Warthaka and Z. Cui (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Texas, Austin, United States, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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