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Findings on Tissue Engineering Discussed by Investigators at Rutgers State University (In Vivo Skeletal Muscle Biocompatibility of Composite, Coaxial...

August 20, 2014



Findings on Tissue Engineering Discussed by Investigators at Rutgers State University (In Vivo Skeletal Muscle Biocompatibility of Composite, Coaxial Electrospun, and Microfibrous Scaffolds)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering. According to news reporting originating in Piscataway, New Jersey, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "One weakness with currently researched skeletal muscle tissue replacement is the lack of contraction and relaxation during the regenerative process. A biocompatible scaffold that can act similar to the muscle would be a pivotal innovation."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Rutgers State University, "Coaxial electrospun scaffolds, capable of movement with electrical stimulation, were created using poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), and a (83/17 or 40/60) poly(acrylic acid)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PAA/PVA) hydrogel. The two scaffolds were implanted into Sprague-Dawley rat vastus lateralis muscle and compared with a phosphate-buffered saline injection sham surgery and an unoperated control. No complications or adverse effects were observed. Rats were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 postimplantation and biocompatibility assessed using enzymatic activity, fibrosis formation, inflammation, scaffold cellular infiltration, and neovascularization. Serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels were significantly higher in scaffold-implanted rats compared with the control on day 7, but returned to baseline by day 14. Day 7 scaffolds showed significant inflammation and fibrosis that decreased over time. Fibroblasts infiltrated the scaffolds early, but decreased with time, while myogenic cell numbers increased."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Neovascularization of both scaffolds occurred as early as day 7. We conclude that the PCL-MWCNT-PAA/PVA scaffolds are biocompatible and suitable for muscle regeneration as myogenic cell growth was supported."

For more information on this research see: In Vivo Skeletal Muscle Biocompatibility of Composite, Coaxial Electrospun, and Microfibrous Scaffolds. Tissue Engineering Part A, 2014;20(13-14):1961-1970. Tissue Engineering Part A can be contacted at: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc, 140 Huguenot Street, 3RD Fl, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA (see also Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting K.D. McKeon-Fischer, Rutgers State University, Dept. of Biomed Engn, Piscataway, NJ 08854, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.H. Rossmeisl, A.R. Whittington and J.W. Freeman.

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, Piscataway, New Jersey, Inflammation, United States, Bioengineering, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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