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Findings on Glycoside Hydrolases Reported by S.M. Hu et al (Relationship between levels of diastatic power enzymes and wort sugar production from...

August 22, 2014



Findings on Glycoside Hydrolases Reported by S.M. Hu et al (Relationship between levels of diastatic power enzymes and wort sugar production from different barley cultivars during the commercial mashing process of brewing)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Ecology, Environment & Conservation -- Investigators discuss new findings in Enzymes and Coenzymes. According to news originating from Qingdao, People's Republic of China, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "The fermentable carbohydrate composition of wort has a direct influence on yeast fermentation efficiency and resultant beer quality. In this study, the relationship between diastatic power enzymes (DPE) and their wort sugars products during the course of small-scale, emulated commercial mashing was investigated."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research, "Malts derived from 13 barley cultivars were mashed and assayed at five time points during mashing for the levels of DPE and fermentable sugars. Comparisons of the patterns of DPE activity and wort sugar production showed that the activity levels of beta-amylase and limit dextrinase (LD) during mashing were variable between the 13 cultivars, in comparison to the level of a-amylase and resultant composition of wort sugars. Moreover, comparison of peak DPE activities indicated that alpha-amylase correlated positively and significantly with LD, while no obvious correlation was found between beta-amylase and either alpha-amylase or LD, indicating that activity pattern of alpha-amylase and LD was closely related during mashing. Multiple linear regression models, based on levels of the DPE as various time points during mashing, thermostability of beta-amylase and malt Kolbach index, were able to explain 42.9%, 91.9%, 94%, and 73.2% of wort maltotriose, maltose, glucose, and fermentable sugar composition, respectively."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "A combination of these insights into the dynamics of starch hydrolysis during mashing will assist brewers in malt cultivar selection and the adjustment of mashing conditions so as optimize the sugar content for the efficient production of high quality beer."

For more information on this research see: Relationship between levels of diastatic power enzymes and wort sugar production from different barley cultivars during the commercial mashing process of brewing. Starch-Starke, 2014;66(7-8):615-623. Starch-Starke can be contacted at: Wiley-V C H Verlag Gmbh, Boschstrasse 12, D-69469 Weinheim, Germany.

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from S.M. Hu, Tsingtao Brewery Co Ltd, State Key Lab Biol Fermentat Engn Beer, Qingdao 266100, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include J.H. Yu, J.J. Dong, D.E. Evans, J. Liu, S.L. Huang, S.X. Huang, W. Fan, H. Yin and M. Li.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Qingdao, Amylases, Glycoside Hydrolases, Enzymes and Coenzymes, People's Republic of China

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Ecology, Environment & Conservation


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