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Findings from University of California School of Medicine in Pathology Reported (Molecular pathology of prostate cancer revealed by next-generation...

August 19, 2014



Findings from University of California School of Medicine in Pathology Reported (Molecular pathology of prostate cancer revealed by next-generation sequencing: opportunities for genome-based personalized therapy)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Cancer Weekly -- Fresh data on Pathology are presented in a new report. According to news reporting from Los Angeles, California, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "This article reviews recently identified genomic mutations in prostate cancer. Advanced sequencing technologies have made it possible to obtain large amounts of data on genomes and transcriptomes of cancers."

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of California School of Medicine, "Such technologies have been used to sequence prostate cancer of different stages, from treatment-naive cancers, to advanced, castration-resistant cancers to the aggressive small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. For each category of prostate cancer, distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations were discovered, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements. There appears to be a stepwise increase in genomic alterations from low risk to high risk to advanced cancers. These novel findings have significantly increased our knowledge of the genetic basis of human prostate cancer and the molecular mechanisms responsible for disease progression and treatment resistance. Some of the lesions are potential therapeutic targets."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Studies along this direction will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individual patients."

For more information on this research see: Molecular pathology of prostate cancer revealed by next-generation sequencing: opportunities for genome-based personalized therapy. Current Opinion In Urology, 2013;23(3):189-93. (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins - www.lww.com; Current Opinion In Urology - journals.lww.com/co-urology/pages/default.aspx)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Huang, Departments of Pathology and Urology, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1732, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.K. Wang and Y. Sun (see also Pathology).

Keywords for this news article include: Cancer, Therapy, Genetics, Oncology, Pathology, California, Technology, Los Angeles, United States, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Cancer Weekly


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