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Findings from R.Y. Cui and Co-Authors Provides New Data about Food Technology (Effect of different halophilic microbial fermentation patterns on the...

August 19, 2014



Findings from R.Y. Cui and Co-Authors Provides New Data about Food Technology (Effect of different halophilic microbial fermentation patterns on the volatile compound profiles and sensory properties of soy sauce moromi)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Current study results on Food Technology have been published. According to news reporting originating in Luzhou, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The effect of inoculated or co-cultured halophilic lactic bacteria (Tetragenococcus halophilus) and yeasts (Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Candida versatilis) on the quality of soy sauce moromi was investigated. Results showed no significant change in the major physicochemical properties of soy sauce moromi such as amino nitrogen, total acid, and reducing sugar at the end of fermentation, whereas the composition of free amino acids slightly changed with different fermentation patterns."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research, "In the sample inoculated with T. halophilus, the concentration of proline and tryptophan decreased by 18.83 and 50.87 % compared with the blank sample, whereas tyrosine and histidine increased by 32.41 and 27.04 %. In the sample inoculated with Z. rouxii and C. versatilis, the concentration of bitter-tasting lysine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine increased by more than 20 %, and the concentration of tryptophan decreased by 56.71 %. The proportion of amino acids with sweet taste increased by 0.8 % through the co-culture of the three strains. Meanwhile, the total amount of volatile compounds increased by 117.66, 23.28, and 216.88 % in the T. halophilus inoculated sample, two yeast strain inoculated sample, and three strain inoculated sample, respectively. Increased odour activity values of the nine compounds that mainly contributed to the flavour of moromi ranged from 1 to 7.87 times in the three strain inoculated sample."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "These findings revealed that the co-culture of the three strains during moromi fermentation was beneficial to the improvement of flavour of soy sauce moromi."

For more information on this research see: Effect of different halophilic microbial fermentation patterns on the volatile compound profiles and sensory properties of soy sauce moromi. European Food Research and Technology, 2014;239(2):321-331. European Food Research and Technology can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring St, New York, NY 10013, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; European Food Research and Technology - www.springerlink.com/content/1438-2377/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting R.Y. Cui, Natl Engn Res Center Solid State Brewing, Luzhou 646000, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include J. Zheng, C.D. Wu and R.Q. Zhou (see also Food Technology).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Luzhou, Food Technology, People's Republic of China

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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