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Findings from King Abdul-Aziz University in the Area of Nanoparticles Reported (Carbon and Clay Nanoparticles Induce Minimal Stress Responses in Gram...

August 19, 2014



Findings from King Abdul-Aziz University in the Area of Nanoparticles Reported (Carbon and Clay Nanoparticles Induce Minimal Stress Responses in Gram Negative Bacteria and Eukaryotic Fish Cells)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Data detailed on Nanoparticles have been presented. According to news reporting originating in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "We investigated in vitro the potential mutagenic and toxic effects of two clay-based nanoparticles, Cloisite Na+ (Cloisite) and halloysite; and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), commonly used in the polymer composite industry. Using the Ames test, the three nanoparticles did not have a true mutagenic effect, although growth of Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) was diminished at higher nanoparticle concentrations."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from King Abdul-Aziz University, "We investigated the impact of nanoparticles on Escherichia coli and S. typhimurium including oxyR and rpoS mutants, which are susceptible to oxidative stress. The oxyR mutants were inhibited in the presence of nanoparticles, when grown aerobically with light. Toxicity was not observed in the absence of light or during anaerobic growth. E. coli rpoS mutants exhibited some toxicity when cultured with Cloisite and MWCNT only when grown aerobically with light. There was no effect with other nanoparticles, or with S. typhimurium rpoS mutants. MWCNT exhibited a slight toxic effect against Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells only at the highest concentration tested. There was no discernable toxicity to EPC cells caused by the clay nanoparticles. We conclude that clay-based nanoparticles and MWCNT do not exert a mutagenic effect and do not have a general toxic effect across all bacterial species or between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Modest toxicity was only observed in eukaryotic EPC cells against MWCNT at the highest concentration tested."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Limited species-specific toxicity to clay based and MWCNT nanoparticles was seen in bacterial strains primarily due to culture conditions and mutations that exacerbate oxidative stress."

For more information on this research see: Carbon and Clay Nanoparticles Induce Minimal Stress Responses in Gram Negative Bacteria and Eukaryotic Fish Cells. Environmental Toxicology, 2014;29(8):961-968. Environmental Toxicology can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Environmental Toxicology - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1522-7278)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.A. Taylor, King Abdulaziz Univ, Dept. of Phys, Fac Sci, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Additional authors for this research include G.M. Aron, G.W. Beall, N. Dharmasiri, Y.X. Zhang and R.J.C. McLean (see also Nanoparticles).

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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