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Data from Erasmus Medical Center Provide New Insights into Coronary Artery Disease (Impact of biodegradable versus durable polymer drug-eluting...

August 18, 2014



Data from Erasmus Medical Center Provide New Insights into Coronary Artery Disease (Impact of biodegradable versus durable polymer drug-eluting stents on clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis of 15 ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Clinical Trials Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Heart Diseases and Conditions. According to news reporting originating from Rotterdam, Netherlands, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Drug eluting stents (DESs) made with biodegradable polymer have been developed in an attempt to improve clinical outcomes. However, the impact of biodegradable polymers on clinical events and stent thrombosis (ST) remains controversial."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from Erasmus Medical Center, "We searched Medline, the Cochrane Library and other internet sources, without language or date restrictions for articles comparing clinical outcomes between biodegradable polymer DES and durable polymer DES. Safety endpoints were ST (definite, definite/probable), mortality, and myocardial infarction (MI). Efficacy endpoints were major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and target lesion revascularization (TLR). We identified 15 randomized controlled trials (n=17 068) with a weighted mean follow-up of 20.6 months. There was no statistical difference in the incidence of definite/probable ST between durable polymer-and biodegradable polymer-DES; relative risk (RR) 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.11; p=0.22. Biodegradable polymer DES had similar rates of definite ST (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.66-1.33, p=0.72), mortality (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.82-1.09, p=0.43), MI (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92-1.26. p=0.35), MACE (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.91-1.09, p=0.85), and TLR (RR, 0.94, 95% CI 0.83-1.06, p=0.30) compared with durable polymer DES. Based on the stratified analysis of the included trials, the treatment effect on definite ST was different at different follow-up times: ? 1 year favoring durable polymer DES and >1 year favoring biodegradable polymer DES. Biodegradable polymer DES has similar safety and efficacy for treating patients with coronary artery disease compared with durable polymer DES."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Further data with longer term follow-up are warranted to confirm the potential benefits of biodegradable polymer DES."

For more information on this research see: Impact of biodegradable versus durable polymer drug-eluting stents on clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis of 15 randomized trials. Chinese Medical Journal, 2014;127(11):2159-66. Chinese Medical Journal can be contacted at: Chinese Medical Association, 42 Dongsi Xidajie, Beijing 100710, Peoples R China. (Chinese Medical Association - www.cmj.org; Chinese Medical Journal - www.ecmj.org.cn/ch/first_menu.aspx?parent_id=20070904111927001)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Zhang, Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, 3015CE, Netherlands. Additional authors for this research include N. Tian, S. Dong, F. Ye, M. Li, C.V. Bourantas, J. Iqbal, Y. Onuma, T. Muramatsu, R. Diletti, H.M. Garcia-Garcia, B. Xu, P.W. Serruys and S. Chen (see also Heart Diseases and Conditions).

Publisher contact information for the Chinese Medical Journal is: Chinese Medical Association, 42 Dongsi Xidajie, Beijing 100710, Peoples R China.

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Rotterdam, Angiology, Cardiology, Netherlands, Coronary Artery, Arteriosclerosis, Stent Thrombosis, Myocardial Ischemia, Cardiovascular Diseases, Arterial Occlusive Diseases, Heart Diseases and Conditions.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Clinical Trials Week


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