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University of Cologne Reports Findings in Corynebacterium (Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for growth and L-lysine and lycopene production...

July 18, 2014



University of Cologne Reports Findings in Corynebacterium (Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for growth and L-lysine and lycopene production from N-acetyl-glucosamine)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Health & Medicine Week -- Investigators publish new report on Corynebacterium. According to news reporting originating from Cologne, Germany, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Sustainable supply of feedstock has become a key issue in process development in microbial biotechnology. The workhorse of industrial amino acid production Corynebacterium glutamicum has been engineered towards utilization of alternative carbon sources."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the University of Cologne, "Utilization of the chitin-derived aminosugar N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) for both cultivation and production with C. glutamicum has hitherto not been investigated. Albeit this organism harbors the enzymes N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphatedeacetylase and glucosamine-6P deaminase of GlcNAc metabolism (encoded by nagA and nagB, respectively) growth of C. glutamicum with GlcNAc as substrate was not observed. This was attributed to the lack of a functional system for GlcNAc uptake. Of the 17 type strains of the genus Corynebacterium tested here for their ability to grow with GlcNAc, only Corynebacterium glycinophilum DSM45794 was able to utilize this substrate. Complementation studies with a GlcNAc-uptake deficient Escherichia coli strain revealed that C. glycinophilum possesses a nagE-encoded EII permease for GlcNAc uptake. Heterologous expression of the C. glycinophilum nagE in C. glutamicum indeed enabled uptake of GlcNAc. For efficient GlcNac utilization in C. glutamicum, improved expression of nagE with concurrent overexpression of the endogenous nagA and nagB genes was found to be necessary."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Based on this strategy, C. glutamicum strains for the efficient production of the amino acid l-lysine as well as the carotenoid lycopene from GlcNAc as sole substrate were constructed."

For more information on this research see: Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for growth and L-lysine and lycopene production from N-acetyl-glucosamine. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2014;98(12):5633-5643. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring St, New York, NY 10013, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - www.springerlink.com/content/0175-7598/)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting C. Matano, University of Cologne, Inst Biochem, D-50674 Cologne, Germany. Additional authors for this research include A. Uhde, J.W. Youn, T. Maeda, L. Clermont, K. Marin, R. Kramer, V.F. Wendisch and G.M. Seibold (see also Corynebacterium).

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Lysine, Cologne, Germany, Engineering, Corynebacterium, Basic Amino Acids, Diamino Amino Acids, Essential Amino Acids

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Health & Medicine Week


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