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Studies from University of Copenhagen Reveal New Findings on Food Microbiology (Identification of Bacillus species occurring in Kantong, an acid...

July 15, 2014



Studies from University of Copenhagen Reveal New Findings on Food Microbiology (Identification of Bacillus species occurring in Kantong, an acid fermented seed condiment produced in Ghana)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Current study results on Food Microbiology have been published. According to news originating from Frederiksberg, Denmark, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Kantong is a condiment produced in Ghana by the spontaneous fermentation of kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra) seeds with cassava flour as an additive. Fermentation is over a 48 h period followed by a drying and a kneading process."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Copenhagen, "Although lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have previously been identified other micro-organisms may also be involved in the fermentation process. In this study we examined the occurrence of aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEB) in raw materials, during fermentation and in the final product at 2 production sites in Northern Ghana. Total aerobic mesophilic bacterial counts increased from 5.4 +/- 0.1 log(10) CFU/g in the raw materials to 8.9 +/- 0.1 log(10) CFU/g in the final products, with the AEB accounting for between 23% and 80% of the total aerobic mesophilic (TAM) counts. A total of 196 AEB were identified at a species/subspecies level by the use of phenotypic tests and genotypic methods including M13-PCR typing, 16S rRNA and gyrA gene sequencing. Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis (63% of the AEB), Bacillus safensis (26% of the AEB) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum/Bacillus methylotrophicus (9% of the AEB) were the predominant Bacillus species during fermentation and in the final products. B. amyloliquefaciens/B. methyl otrophicus originated from cassava flour, B. safensis from seeds and cassava flour, while the origin of B. subtilis was less clear. Brevi bacillus agri and Peanibacillus spp. occurred sporadically."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Further investigations are required to elucidate the role of AEB occurring in high numbers, in the fermentation of Kantong."

For more information on this research see: Identification of Bacillus species occurring in Kantong, an acid fermented seed condiment produced in Ghana. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2014;180():1-6. International Journal of Food Microbiology can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; International Journal of Food Microbiology - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/505514)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from E.N. Kpikpi, University of Copenhagen, Fac Sci, Dept. of Food Sci, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. Additional authors for this research include L. Thorsen, R. Glover, V.P. Dzogbefia and L. Jespersen (see also Food Microbiology).

Keywords for this news article include: Europe, Denmark, Frederiksberg, Food Microbiology

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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