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Studies from Environmental Protection Agency Add New Findings in the Area of Carbamazepine Therapy (Photocatalytic degradation of carbamazepine in...

July 16, 2014



Studies from Environmental Protection Agency Add New Findings in the Area of Carbamazepine Therapy (Photocatalytic degradation of carbamazepine in wastewater by using a new class of whey-stabilized nanocrystalline TiO2 and ZnO)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Drugs and Therapies. According to news reporting originating in Kansas City, Kansas, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Nanoscale photocatalysts have attracted much attention due to their high surface area to volume ratios. However, due to extremely high reactivity, TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles prepared using different methods tend to either react with surrounding media or agglomerate, resulting in the formation of much larger flocs and significant loss in reactivity."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Environmental Protection Agency, "This work investigates the photocatalytic degradation of carbamazepine (CBZ), a persistent pharmaceutical compound from wastewater (WW) using TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles prepared in the presence of a water-soluble whey powder as stabilizer. The TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles prepared in the presence of whey stabilizer displayed much less agglomeration and greater degradation power than those prepared without a stabilizer. Higher photocatalytic degradation of carbamazepine was observed (100%) by using whey stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles with 55 min irradiation time as compared to ZnO nanoparticles (92%). The higher degradation of CBZ in wastewater by using TiO2 nanoparticles as compared to ZnO nanoparticles was due to formation of higher photo-generated holes with high oxidizing power of TiO2. The photocatalytic capacity of ZnO anticipated as similar to that of TiO2 as it has the same band gap energy (3.2 eV) as TiO2. However, in the case of ZnO, photocorrosion frequently occurs with the illumination of UV light and this phenomenon is considered as one of the main reasons for the decrease of ZnO photocatalytic activity in aqueous solutions. Further, the estrogenic activity of photocatalyzed WW sample with CBZ and its by-products was carried out by yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay method."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Based upon the YES test results, none of the samples showed estrogenic activity."

For more information on this research see: Photocatalytic degradation of carbamazepine in wastewater by using a new class of whey-stabilized nanocrystalline TiO2 and ZnO. Science of the Total Environment, 2014;485():263-269. Science of the Total Environment can be contacted at: Elsevier Science Bv, PO Box 211, 1000 Ae Amsterdam, Netherlands. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Science of the Total Environment - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/503360)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting D.P. Mohapatra, Environmental Protection Agency, Kansas City, KS 66117, United States. Additional authors for this research include S.K. Brar, R. Daghrir, R.D. Tyagi, P. Picard, R.Y. Surampalli and P. Drogui (see also Drugs and Therapies).

Keywords for this news article include: Pharmaceuticals, Kansas City, Nanoparticle, United States, Carbamazepine, Photocatalyst, Nanotechnology, Photocatalytic, Nanocrystalline, Drugs and Therapies, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America, Central Nervous System Agents, Dibenzazepine Anticonvulsants

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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