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Researchers from University of Toronto Report on Findings in Life Science Research (Fusion of a xylan-binding module to gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase...

July 15, 2014



Researchers from University of Toronto Report on Findings in Life Science Research (Fusion of a xylan-binding module to gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase increases activity and promotes stable immobilization)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Life Science Research. According to news reporting out of Toronto, Canada, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "The xylan-binding module Clostridium thermocellum CBM22A was successfully fused to a gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase, GOOX-VN, from Sarocladium strictum via a short TP linker, allowing the fused protein to effectively bind different xylans. The presence of the CtCBM22A at the N-terminal of GOOX-VN increased catalytic activity on mono-and oligo-saccharides by 2-3 fold while not affecting binding affinity to these substrates."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Toronto, "Notably, both GOOX-VN and its CBM fusion also showed oxidation of xylo-oligosaccharides with degrees of polymerization greater than six. Whereas fusion to CtCBM22A did not alter the thermostability of GOOX-VN or reduce substrate inhibition, CtCBM22A_GOOX-VN could be immobilized to insoluble oat spelt xylan while retaining wild-type activity. QCM-D analysis showed that the fused enzyme remained bound during oxidation."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "These features could be harnessed to generate hemicellulose-based biosensors that detect and quantify the presence of different oligosaccharides."

For more information on this research see: Fusion of a xylan-binding module to gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase increases activity and promotes stable immobilization. Plos One, 2014;9(4):e95170. (Public Library of Science - www.plos.org; Plos One - www.plosone.org)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting T.V. Vuong, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (see also Life Science Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Oxidase, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Life Science Research, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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