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Researchers from University of North Carolina Detail New Studies and Findings in the Area of Chemotherapy (Does pharmacogenomics account for...

July 16, 2014



Researchers from University of North Carolina Detail New Studies and Findings in the Area of Chemotherapy (Does pharmacogenomics account for variability in control of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with 5-hydroxytryptamine type ...)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Research findings on Drugs and Therapies are discussed in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting is one of the most concerning adverse drug effects from cytotoxic chemotherapy. Despite appropriate use of antiemetic guidelines, 20-30 % of patients experience breakthrough nausea and vomiting secondary to chemotherapy."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of North Carolina, "To assess the variability of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonist efficacy caused by genetic variation, a review of the available literature was conducted. From the literature, three sources of pharmacogenomic variability were identified: polymorphisms associated with 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor subunits, drug metabolism via cytochromes P450, and drug transport in the body. Testing for receptor subunit polymorphisms is not applicable to a clinical setting at this time; however, cytochrome P450 2D6 testing is FDA-approved and widely accessible. Cytochrome P450 2D6 ultrarapid metabolizers and poor metabolizers displayed altered antiemetic efficacy when compared with intermediate metabolizers and extensive metabolizers."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "We postulate that testing for cytochrome P450 2D6 phenotypes may be the most accessible way to provide individualized antiemetic therapy in the future."

For more information on this research see: Does pharmacogenomics account for variability in control of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonists? Current Oncology Reports, 2013;15(3):276-85. (Springer - www.springer.com; Current Oncology Reports - www.springerlink.com/content/1523-3790/)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting M. Trammel, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Campus Box 7355, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7355, United States. Additional authors for this research include M. Roederer, J. Patel and H. McLeod (see also Drugs and Therapies).

Keywords for this news article include: Antiemetics, Genetics, Vomiting, Chapel Hill, Cytochromes, Chemotherapy, Hemeproteins, United States, North Carolina, Drugs and Therapies, Gastrointestinal Agents, North and Central America, Central Nervous System Agents.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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