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Researchers from University of Nijmegen Describe Findings in Tissue Engineering (In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor...

July 16, 2014



Researchers from University of Nijmegen Describe Findings in Tissue Engineering (In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators discuss new findings in Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering. According to news reporting originating in Nijmegen, Netherlands, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Nijmegen, "Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-coglycolic acid)/poly(e-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23+/-0.35mm(2) at 21 days compared to 0.99+/-0.43mm(2) and 0.50+/-0.29mm(2) in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p < 0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72+/-0.40mm(2). Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26+/-0.43mm(2) and 1.19+/-0.33mm(2) , respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p < 0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering."

For more information on this research see: In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds. Tissue Engineering Part A, 2014;20(1-2):139-146. Tissue Engineering Part A can be contacted at: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc, 140 Huguenot Street, 3RD Fl, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA (see also Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering).

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.B. Yeatts, Univ Nijmegen Med Center, Dept. of Biomat, Nijmegen, Netherlands. Additional authors for this research include S.K. Both, W.X. Yang, H.S. Alghamdi, F. Yang, J.P. Fisher and J.A. Jansen.

Keywords for this news article include: Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, Europe, Nijmegen, Netherlands, Nanofibrous, Bone Research, Bioengineering, Nanotechnology, Bone Regeneration, Emerging Technologies, Regeneration Medicine, Bone-Tissue Engineering

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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