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Researchers from Rice University Discuss Findings in Stem Cells (The effect of hypoxia on the chondrogenic differentiation of co-cultured articular...

July 16, 2014



Researchers from Rice University Discuss Findings in Stem Cells (The effect of hypoxia on the chondrogenic differentiation of co-cultured articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells in scaffolds)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Fresh data on Stem Cell Research are presented in a new report. According to news reporting originating in Houston, Texas, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "In this work, we investigated the effects of lowered oxygen tension (20% and 5% O2) on the chondrogenesis and hypertrophy of articular chondrocytes (ACs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their co-cultures with a 30:70 AC:MSC ratio. Cells were cultured for six weeks within porous scaffolds, and their cellularity, cartilaginous matrix production (collagen II/I expression ratio, hydroxyproline and GAG content) and hypertrophy markers (collagen X expression, ALP activity, calcium accumulation) were analyzed."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from Rice University, "After two weeks, hypoxic culture conditions had expedited chondrogenesis with all cell types by increasing collagen II/I expression ratio and matrix synthesis by ~2.5-11 and ~1.5-3.0 fold, respectively. At later times, hypoxia decreased cellularity but had little effect on matrix synthesis. ACs and co-cultures showed similarly high collagen II/I expression ratio and GAG rich matrix formation, whereas MSCs produced the least hyaline cartilage-like matrix and obtained a hypertrophic phenotype with eventual calcification. MSC hypertrophy was further emphasized in hypoxic conditions."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "We conclude that the most promising cell source for cartilage engineering was co-cultures, as they have a potential to decrease the need for primary chondrocyte harvest and expansion while obtaining a stable highly chondrogenic phenotype independent of the oxygen tension in the cultures."

For more information on this research see: The effect of hypoxia on the chondrogenic differentiation of co-cultured articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells in scaffolds. Biomaterials, 2013;34(17):4266-73. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Biomaterials - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/30392)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting V.V. Meretoja, Dept. of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, United States. Additional authors for this research include R.L. Dahlin, S. Wright, F.K. Kasper and A.G Mikos (see also Stem Cell Research).

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Biomedicine, Texas, Houston, Collagen, Hypertrophy, Chondrocytes, United States, Bioengineering, Stem Cell Research, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Connective Tissue Cells, North and Central America, Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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