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Researchers from North Carolina State University Report Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Stem Cells (Cyclic Tensile Strain Enhances...

July 16, 2014



Researchers from North Carolina State University Report Details of New Studies and Findings in the Area of Stem Cells (Cyclic Tensile Strain Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Osteoporotic Donors)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Fresh data on Stem Cell Research are presented in a new report. According to news originating from Raleigh, North Carolina, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "We have shown that the uniaxial cyclic tensile strain of magnitude 10% promotes and enhances osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) from normal, nonosteoporotic donors. In the present study, MSC from osteoporotic donors were analyzed for changes in mRNA expression in response to 10% uniaxial tensile strain to identify potential mechanisms underlying the use of this mechanical loading paradigm for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from North Carolina State University, "Human MSC isolated from three female, postmenopausal osteoporotic donors were analyzed for their responses to mechanical loading using microarray analysis of over 47,000 gene probes. Human MSC were seeded in three-dimensional collagen type I constructs to mimic the organic extracellular matrix of bone and 10% uniaxial cyclic tensile strain was applied to promote osteogenesis. Seventy-nine genes were shown to be regulated within hMSC from osteoporotic donors in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. Upregulation of six genes were further confirmed with realtime RT-PCR: jun D proto-oncogene (JUND) and plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor (PLAUR), two genes identified as potential key molecules from network analysis; phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, delta polypeptide (PIK3CD) and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5B (WNT5B), two genes with known importance in bone biology; and, PDZ and LIM domain 4 (PDLIM4) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), two genes that we have previously shown are significantly regulated in hASC in response to this mechanical stimulus. Function analysis indicated that 10% cyclic tensile strain induced expression of genes associated with cell movement, cell proliferation, and tissue development, including development in musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Our results demonstrate that hMSC from aged, osteoporotic donors are capable of enhanced osteogenic differentiation in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain with significant increases in the expression of genes associated with enhanced cell proliferation, musculoskeletal development, and angiogenesis. Surprisingly, cyclic tensile strain of magnitude 10% not only enhanced osteogenesis in hMSC from osteoporotic donors, but also enhanced expression of angiogenic factors."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Better understanding and methodologies to promote osteogenesis in hMSC from elderly, osteoporotic donors may greatly facilitate achieving long-term success in bone regeneration and functional bone tissue engineering for this ever-growing patient population."

For more information on this research see: Cyclic Tensile Strain Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Osteoporotic Donors. Tissue Engineering Part A, 2014;20(1-2):67-78. Tissue Engineering Part A can be contacted at: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc, 140 Huguenot Street, 3RD Fl, New Rochelle, NY 10801, USA (see also Stem Cell Research).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from A. Charoenpanich, North Carolina State University, Dept. of Mat Sci & Engn, Raleigh, NC 27695, United States. Additional authors for this research include M.E. Wall, C.J. Tucker, D.M.K. Andrews, D.S. Lalush, D.R. Dirschl and E.G. Loboa.

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Raleigh, Genetics, Angiogenesis, United States, Bone Research, North Carolina, Cell Proliferation, Stem Cell Research, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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