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Researchers at University of North Carolina Release New Data on Sensor Research (Membrane thickness dependence of nanopore formation with a focused...

July 15, 2014



Researchers at University of North Carolina Release New Data on Sensor Research (Membrane thickness dependence of nanopore formation with a focused helium ion beam)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- Research findings on Sensor Research are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Greensboro, North Carolina, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "Solid-state nanopores are emerging as a valuable tool for the detection and characterization of individual biomolecules. Central to their success is the realization of fabrication strategies that are both rapid and flexible in their ability to achieve diverse device dimensions."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of North Carolina, "In this paper, we demonstrate the membrane thickness dependence of solid-state nanopore formation with a focused helium ion beam. We vary membrane thickness in situ and show that the rate of pore expansion follows a reproducible trend under all investigated membrane conditions. We show that this trend shifts to lower ion dose for thin membranes in a manner that can be described quantitatively, allowing devices of arbitrary dimension to be realized."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Finally, we demonstrate that thin, small-diameter nanopores formed with our approach can be utilized for high signal-to-noise ratio resistive pulse sensing of DNA."

For more information on this research see: Membrane thickness dependence of nanopore formation with a focused helium ion beam. Sensors, 2014;14(5):8150-61. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Sensors - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/504103)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from F. Sawafta, Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27401, United States. Additional authors for this research include A.T. Carlsen and A.R Hall.

Keywords for this news article include: Greensboro, United States, North Carolina, Sensor Research, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Journal of Technology


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