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Researchers at Johns Hopkins University Report New Data on Glutamic Acid [Planar microphone based on piezoelectric electrospun...

July 15, 2014



Researchers at Johns Hopkins University Report New Data on Glutamic Acid [Planar microphone based on piezoelectric electrospun poly(gamma-benzyl-alpha, L-glutamate) nanofibers]

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Glutamic Acid. According to news originating from Baltimore, Maryland, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Velocity and pressure microphones composed of piezoelectric poly(gamma-benzyl-alpha, L-glutamate) (PBLG) nanofibers were produced by adhering a single layer of PBLG film to a Mylar diaphragm."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Johns Hopkins University, "The device exhibited a sensitivity of -60 dBV/Pa in air, and both pressure and velocity response showed a broad frequency response that was primarily controlled by the stiffness of the supporting diaphragm. The pressure microphone response was +/- 3 dB between 200 Hz and 4 kHz when measured in a semi-anechoic chamber."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Thermal stability, easy fabrication, and simple design make this single element transducer ideal for various applications including those for underwater and high temperature use."

For more information on this research see: Planar microphone based on piezoelectric electrospun poly(gamma-benzyl-alpha, L-glutamate) nanofibers. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2014;135(6):EL291-EL297. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America can be contacted at: Acoustical Soc Amer Amer Inst Physics, Ste 1 No 1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502, USA. (Acoustical Society of America - acousticalsociety.org/; Journal of the Acoustical Society of America - asadl.org/jasa/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from K.L. Ren, Johns Hopkins University, Dept. of Mech Engn, Baltimore, MD 21218, United States. Additional authors for this research include J.E. West and S.M. Yu (see also Glutamic Acid).

Keywords for this news article include: Maryland, Baltimore, Nanofiber, Glutamates, United States, Glutamic Acid, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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