News Column

Research from Uppsala University Reveals New Findings on Tissue Engineering (Attachment of flexible heparin chains to gelatin scaffolds improves...

July 18, 2014



Research from Uppsala University Reveals New Findings on Tissue Engineering (Attachment of flexible heparin chains to gelatin scaffolds improves endothelial cell infiltration)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Angiogenesis Weekly -- Fresh data on Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering are presented in a new report. According to news reporting out of Uppsala, Sweden, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Long-term survival of implanted cells requires oxygen and nutrients, the need for which is met by vascularization of the implant. The use of scaffolds with surface-attached heparin as anchoring points for angiogenic growth factors has been reported to improve this process."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Uppsala University, "We examined the potential role of surface modification of gelatin scaffolds in promoting endothelial cell infiltration by using a unique macromolecular conjugate of heparin as a coating. Compared to other heparin coatings, this surface modification provides flexible heparin chains, representing a new concept in heparin conjugation. In vitro cell infiltration of scaffolds was assessed using a three-dimensional model in which the novel heparin surface, without growth factors, showed a 2.5-fold increase in the number of infiltrating endothelial cells when compared to control scaffolds. No additional improvement was achieved by adding growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and/or fibroblast growth factor-2) to the scaffold. In vivo experiments confirmed these results and also showed that the addition of angiogenic growth factors did not significantly increase the endothelial cell infiltration but increased the number of inflammatory cells in the implanted scaffolds."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The endothelial cell-stimulating ability of the heparin surface alone, combined with its growth factor-binding capacity, renders it an interesting candidate surface treatment to create a prevascularized site prepared for implantation of cells and tissues, in particular those sensitive to inflammation but in need of supportive revascularization, such as pancreatic islets of Langerhans."

For more information on this research see: Attachment of flexible heparin chains to gelatin scaffolds improves endothelial cell infiltration. Tissue Engineering Part a, 2013;19(11-12):1336-48 (see also Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting J. Leijon, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Dept. of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Additional authors for this research include F. Carlsson, J. Brannstrom, J. Sanchez, R. Larsson, B. Nilsson, P.U. Magnusson and M. Rosenquist.

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, Sweden, Europe, Uppsala, Gelatin, Angiogenesis, Bioengineering, Scleroproteins, Endothelial Cells.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Angiogenesis Weekly


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters