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Reports Summarize Gene Therapy Study Results from University of Pennsylvania (Multiple recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotypes display...

July 17, 2014



Reports Summarize Gene Therapy Study Results from University of Pennsylvania (Multiple recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotypes display persistent in vivo gene expression in vector-transduced rat stifle joints)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Gene Therapy Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Biotechnology. According to news originating from Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Our aim was to investigate serotype-specific cell and tissue-transduction tropisms, transgene expression levels and longevity, and immunogenicity of candidate rAAV serotypes in rat osteochondral cells, tissues, and stifle joints. In vitro, we used six rAAV serotypes and two promoters to transduce synoviocytes and chondrocytes."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Pennsylvania, "Serotypes rAAV2/5 and 2/2 yielded the highest transduction efficiency 4 days after transduction. No differences were detected between cytomegalovirus and chicken ?-actin promoters. In vivo, intra-articular injection was used to introduce four rAAV serotypes into 4-month-old rats in the left stifle joint. Eleven months later, serotype 2/5 vector, diluted with saline or surfactant, was injected into the right stifle joint of the same rats. Rats were analyzed up to 12 months after initial injection. Bioluminescence was detected at 7 days and all serotypes tested displayed bioluminescence above controls after 1 year in the left stifle. Gene expression was detected in the right stifle joints of all rats with the exception of rats previously injected with serotype 2/5. We observed no difference irrespective of whether the luciferin was injected subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. However, surfactant-diluted vectors led to increased gene expression compared with saline-diluted vectors. Cell-and tissue-specific transduction was observed in rat stifles injected with an nLacZ-containing rAAV. Transduction was greatest in stromal tissues and mesenchymal cell types. Exposure to a specific serotype did not inhibit subsequent transduction with a different serotype at a second vector injection."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Including surfactant as a vector diluent increased gene expression within the stifle joint and should be considered for in vivo gene therapy applications."

For more information on this research see: Multiple recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotypes display persistent in vivo gene expression in vector-transduced rat stifle joints. Human Gene Therapy Methods, 2013;24(3):185-94 (see also Biotechnology).

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from J.B. Mason, Dept. of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692, United States. Additional authors for this research include B.L. Gurda, J.B. Engiles, K.D. Hankenson, J.M. Wilson and D.W Richardson.

Keywords for this news article include: Biotechnology, Pennsylvania, United States, Kennett Square, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Gene Therapy Weekly


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