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Reports from Flinders University of South Australia Advance Knowledge in Fullerenes (Surfactant Concentration Dependent Spectral Effects of Oxygen...

July 15, 2014



Reports from Flinders University of South Australia Advance Knowledge in Fullerenes (Surfactant Concentration Dependent Spectral Effects of Oxygen and Depletion Interactions in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Investigators publish new report on Fullerenes. According to news reporting originating from Adelaide, Australia, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Quenching of optical absorbance spectra for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been observed to be more pronounced at higher concentrations of the surfactant. The protonation-based quenching behavior displays wavelength dependence, affecting larger diameter nanotube species preferentially."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the Flinders University of South Australia, "Although absorbance may be recovered by hydroxide addition, pH measurements suggest that hydrolysis of SDS does not play a major role in the short term quenching behavior at high SDS concentrations. The degree of quenching is observed to correlate well with an increase in attractive depletion as SDS concentration is increased, while the extent of depletion is found to depend heavily on the concentration of preparation in comparison to the final SDS concentration. Attractive depletion in SDS is also found to be preferential for CNTs of larger diameter. It is proposed that depletion enhances the quenching effect due to close association of CNT-SDS complexes providing higher SDS densities on the CNT surface, leading to further oxidation. In addition, the quenching behavior in SDS is found to strongly suppress the optical and Raman signal from metallic nanotube species even at high pH."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Displacement of SDS by sodium deoxycholate as a secondary surfactant is able to reverse the effects of protonation of metallic species, whereas hydroxide addition is only partially effective."

For more information on this research see: Surfactant Concentration Dependent Spectral Effects of Oxygen and Depletion Interactions in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2014;118(23):6288-6296. Journal of Physical Chemistry B can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; Journal of Physical Chemistry B - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/jpcbfk)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting A.J. Blanch, Flinders University of South Australia, Sch Chem & Phys Sci, Flinders Center Nanoscale Sci & Technol, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia (see also Fullerenes).

Keywords for this news article include: Adelaide, Dodecanol, Fullerenes, Sulfur Acids, Nanotechnology, Sulfonic Acids, Alkanesulfonates, Carbon Nanotubes, Sulfur Compounds, Emerging Technologies, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate, Australia and New Zealand

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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