News Column

Patent Issued for Methods for Securing Strands of Woven Medical Devices and Devices Formed Thereby

July 14, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Business Week -- A patent by the inventor Sheldon, Jeffery J. (Friendswood, TX), filed on March 5, 2002, was published online on July 1, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Alexandria, Virginia, by NewsRx correspondents (see also IDEV Technologies, Inc.).

Patent number 8764817 is assigned to IDEV Technologies, Inc. (Webster, TX).

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The present invention relates to methods useful for securing intersections formed by crossed strands of medical devices, such as woven stents. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods that include the use of securing materials to secure intersections formed by crossed strands of medical devices, and the devices formed thereby.

"Medical devices serve a variety of uses in the treatment of various vascular and non-vascular disorders. Stents are one example of such medical devices. A stent is a device that may be placed within an internal body structure, such as a blood vessel, to maintain the patency of the internal body structure. For example, when a blood vessel becomes weak and contracted due, for example, to disease and begins to collapse, a stent may be inserted into the blood vessel, placed at the weak or diseased location, and will serve to prop open the weak or diseased portion of the blood vessel in order to allow blood to continue flowing. Various graft materials may also be coupled to stents to form what some term stent grafts. These stents grafts may be thought of as woven frames that have biocompatible jackets coupled to the frames. When an internal body structure such as a blood vessel becomes weak and expands, thereby creating a conduit with a weak, ballooned-out segment, a stent graft may be placed across the ballooned-out segment in order to restore the proper flow of fluid through the body structure.

"The types of medical devices just described are often woven out of strands of biocompatible material of some kind, as are certain metals. One such woven medical device, in particular a woven stent, is the subject of U.S. Pat. No. 4,655,771 to Wallsten (hereinafter 'the Wallsten patent'), which is hereby expressly incorporated herein by reference. A version of the subject of this patent is marketed as the WALLSTENT, which is manufactured and sold by Boston Scientific Corporation. Other woven medical devices are disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/496,243, filed Feb. 1, 2000 and entitled 'Woven Intravascular Devices and Methods For Making the Same and Apparatus for Delivery of the Same' (hereinafter 'first patent application') and in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/495,984, filed Feb. 1, 2000 and entitled 'Woven Bifurcated and Trifurcated Stents and Methods For Making the Same' (hereinafter 'second patent application'), both of which are hereby expressly incorporated herein by reference. The ends of the strands of woven devices may be left free after the weaving process is complete. If delivered into an internal body structure, such as a blood vessel, in such a condition, the free strand ends may damage the internal body structure.

"Different steps have been taken to secure the free strand ends of such woven devices. Some methods that have been used in this regard include securing free strand ends using laser welding, soldering, and brazing. These traditional methods may raise issues about material biocompatibility, and may cause problems such as loss of product structural integrity due to a change in material characteristics during the securing process, and the possible introduction of a foreign body into vessel should a piece of welding or soldering material break free. These problems are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather are among many that tend to impair the effectiveness of previously known methods of securing the free strand ends of certain woven medical devices. Other noteworthy problems may also exist; however, those presented above should be sufficient to demonstrate that previous techniques of securing the free strand ends, also described herein as securing the intersection formed by two or more crossed strands, of certain medical devices have not been altogether satisfactory."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent, NewsRx journalists also obtained the inventor's summary information for this patent: "In one respect, a method of securing an intersection formed from two or more crossed strands, in which the intersection defines at least two sections, is provided. The method includes passing a securing material through at least two of the at least two sections defined by the intersection. The passing includes bending the securing material at a location, thereby defining a securing material segment on each side of the location. The method also includes joining the two securing material segments to secure the intersection.

"In other respects, the joining may include tying the two securing material segments. The securing material may include, for example, thread, nylon, metal, or wire. The securing material may be radio opaque. The method may also include gluing the securing material. The method may include heating the securing material. The method may also include cutting excess securing material. In one embodiment, each strand has a free end that extends away from the intersection; the free end of each strand and the intersection may define a strand segment having a length; and the method may include reducing the length of at least one of the strand segments.

"In another respect, another method of securing an intersection formed from two or more crossed strands, in which the intersection defines at least two sections, is provided. The method includes bending a securing material, thereby forming a closed end and a securing material segment on each side of the closed end; passing the closed end through at least one of the at least two sections; passing both securing material segments through at least one of the at least two sections; and passing both securing material segments through the closed end to secure the intersection.

"In other respects, the method may also include joining the securing material segments. The joining may include tying the two securing material segments. The securing material may include, for example, thread, nylon, metal, or wire. The securing material may be radio opaque. The method may also include gluing the securing material. The method may include heating the securing material. The method may also include cutting excess securing material. In one embodiment, each strand has a free end that extends away from the intersection; the free end of each strand and the intersection may define a strand segment having a length; and the method may include reducing the length of at least one of the strand segments. The method may further include passing each securing material segment at least twice through at least two of the at least two sections.

"In still another respect, a device suitable for implantation into a living being is provided. The device includes a body having at least two strands crossed to form an intersection. The intersection defines at least two sections. The device also includes a securing material passed through at least two of the at least two sections. The securing material is bent at a location and has a securing material segment on each side of the location. The securing material segments are joined together."

URL and more information on this patent, see: Sheldon, Jeffery J.. Methods for Securing Strands of Woven Medical Devices and Devices Formed Thereby. U.S. Patent Number 8764817, filed March 5, 2002, and published online on July 1, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=8764817.PN.&OS=PN/8764817RS=PN/8764817

Keywords for this news article include: IDEV Technologies Inc..

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Source: Biotech Business Week


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