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New Tissue Engineering Findings from University of Erlangen Discussed (Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS...

July 16, 2014



New Tissue Engineering Findings from University of Erlangen Discussed (Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Investigators publish new report on Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering. According to news reporting originating in Erlangen, Germany, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Cardiovascular diseases, especially myocardial infarction, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, also resulting in huge economic burdens on national economies. A cardiac patch strategy aims at regenerating an infarcted heart by providing healthy functional cells to the injured region via a carrier substrate, and providing mechanical support, thereby preventing deleterious ventricular remodeling."

The news reporters obtained a quote from the research from the University of Erlangen, "In the present work, polyaniline (PANI) was doped with camphorsulfonic acid and blended with poly(glycerol-sebacate) at ratios of 10, 20 and 30vol.% PANI content to produce electrically conductive composite cardiac patches via the solvent casting method. The composites were characterized in terms of their electrical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. The in vitro biodegradability of the composites was also evaluated. Electrical conductivity increased from 0Scm(-1) for pure PGS to 0.018Scm(-1) for 30vol.% PANI-PGS samples. Moreover, the conductivities were preserved for at least 100h post fabrication. Tensile tests revealed an improvement in the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elasticity with increasing PANI content. The degradation products caused a local drop in pH, which was higher in all composite samples compared with pure PGS, hinting at a buffering effect due to the presence of PANI. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the composites was confirmed when C2C12 cells attached and proliferated on samples with varying PANI content. Furthermore, leaching of acid dopants from the developed composites did not have any deleterious effect on the viability of C2C12 cells."

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: "Taken together, these results confirm the potential of PANI-PGS composites for use as substrates to modulate cellular behavior via electrical stimulation, and as biocompatible scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications."

For more information on this research see: Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Acta Biomaterialia, 2014;10(6):2434-45. (Elsevier - www.elsevier.com; Acta Biomaterialia - www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/702994)

Our news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained by contacting T.H. Qazi, Institute of Biomaterials, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr 6, 91058 Erlangen, Germany. Additional authors for this research include R. Rai, D. Dippold, J.E. Roether, D.W. Schubert, E. Rosellini, N. Barbani and A.R Boccaccini (see also Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering).

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Biomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, Europe, Germany, Erlangen, Cardiology, Bioengineering.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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