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New Tissue Engineering Findings from ACTA Described (Human hypertrophic and keloid scar models: principles, limitations and future challenges from a...

July 16, 2014



New Tissue Engineering Findings from ACTA Described (Human hypertrophic and keloid scar models: principles, limitations and future challenges from a tissue engineering perspective)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Researchers detail new data in Tissue Engineering. According to news reporting originating from Amsterdam, Netherlands, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Most cutaneous wounds heal with scar formation. Ideally, an inconspicuous normotrophic scar is formed, but an abnormal scar (hypertrophic scar or keloid) can also develop."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from ACTA, "A major challenge to scientists and physicians is to prevent adverse scar formation after severe trauma (e.g. burn injury) and understand why some individuals will form adverse scars even after relatively minor injury. Currently, many different models exist to study scar formation, ranging from simple monolayer cell culture to 3D tissue-engineered models even to humanized mouse models. Currently, these high-/medium-throughput test models avoid the main questions referring to why an adverse scar forms instead of a normotrophic scar and what causes a hypertrophic scar to form rather than a keloid scar and also, how is the genetic predisposition of the individual and the immune system involved. This information is essential if we are to identify new drug targets and develop optimal strategies in the future to prevent adverse scar formation."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This viewpoint review summarizes the progress on in vitro and animal scar models, stresses the limitations in the current models and identifies the future challenges if scar-free healing is to be achieved in the future."

For more information on this research see: Human hypertrophic and keloid scar models: principles, limitations and future challenges from a tissue engineering perspective. Experimental Dermatology, 2014;23(6):382-386. Experimental Dermatology can be contacted at: Wiley-Blackwell, 111 River St, Hoboken 07030-5774, NJ, USA. (Wiley-Blackwell - www.wiley.com/; Experimental Dermatology - onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0625)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting L.J. van den Broek, Academy Center Dental ACTA, Dept. of Oral Cell Biol, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Additional authors for this research include G.C. Limandjaja, F.B. Niessen and S. Gibbs (see also Tissue Engineering).

Keywords for this news article include: Tissue Engineering, Europe, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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