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New RNA Research Findings from University of Kentucky Outlined (Fabrication of 14 different RNA nanoparticles for specific tumor targeting without...

July 15, 2014



New RNA Research Findings from University of Kentucky Outlined (Fabrication of 14 different RNA nanoparticles for specific tumor targeting without accumulation in normal organs)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Life Science Weekly -- Current study results on Life Science Research have been published. According to news reporting out of Lexington, Kentucky, by NewsRx editors, research stated, "Due to structural flexibility, RNase sensitivity, and serum instability, RNA nanoparticles with concrete shapes for in vivo application remain challenging to construct. Here we report the construction of 14 RNA nanoparticles with solid shapes for targeting cancers specifically."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Kentucky, "These RNA nanoparticles were resistant to RNase degradation, stable in serum for >36 h, and stable in vivo after systemic injection. By applying RNA nanotechnology and exemplifying with these 14 RNA nanoparticles, we have established the technology and developed 'toolkits' utilizing a variety of principles to construct RNA architectures with diverse shapes and angles. The structure elements of phi29 motor pRNA were utilized for fabrication of dimers, twins, trimers, triplets, tetramers, quadruplets, pentamers, hexamers, heptamers, and other higher-order oligomers, as well as branched diverse architectures via hand-in-hand, foot-to-foot, and arm-on-arm interactions. These novel RNA nanostructures harbor resourceful functionalities for numerous applications in nanotechnology and medicine. It was found that all incorporated functional modules, such as siRNA, ribozymes, aptamers, and other functionalities, folded correctly and functioned independently within the nanoparticles. The incorporation of all functionalities was achieved prior, but not subsequent, to the assembly of the RNA nanoparticles, thus ensuring the production of homogeneous therapeutic nanoparticles. More importantly, upon systemic injection, these RNA nanoparticles targeted cancer exclusively in vivo without accumulation in normal organs and tissues. These findings open a new territory for cancer targeting and treatment."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The versatility and diversity in structure and function derived from one biological RNA molecule implies immense potential concealed within the RNA nanotechnology field."

For more information on this research see: Fabrication of 14 different RNA nanoparticles for specific tumor targeting without accumulation in normal organs. Rna, 2013;19(6):767-77 (see also Life Science Research).

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Shu, Nanobiotechnology Center, Markey Cancer Center and Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536, United States. Additional authors for this research include F. Haque, D. Shu, W. Li, Z. Zhu, M. Kotb, Y. Lyubchenko and P. Guo.

Keywords for this news article include: Kentucky, Lexington, United States, Life Science Research, North and Central America.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Life Science Weekly


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