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New Glucosidases Findings Has Been Reported by Investigators at University of Stellenbosch (Over-expression of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

July 16, 2014



New Glucosidases Findings Has Been Reported by Investigators at University of Stellenbosch (Over-expression of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae exocytic SNARE genes increased heterologous cellulase secretion)

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Current study results on Enzymes and Coenzymes have been published. According to news originating from Stellenbosch, South Africa, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "SNAREs (soluble NSF [N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor] attachment receptor proteins) are required at the majority of fusion events during intracellular membrane transport and play crucial roles in facilitating protein trafficking between the various membrane-enclosed organelles and the plasma membrane. We demonstrate increases in the secretion of the Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (a cellobiohydrolase) and the Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (a beta-glucosidase), through the separate and simultaneous over-expression of different components of the exocytic SNARE complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Stellenbosch, "Over-expression of SNC1 yielded the biggest improvement in Te-Cel7A secretion (71 %), whilst SSO1 over-expression lead to the highest increases in Sf-Cel3A secretion (43.8 %). Simultaneous over-expression of differential combinations of these SNARE components yielded maximal increases of similar to 52 % and similar to 49 % for the secretion of Te-Cel7A and Sf-Cel3A, respectively. These increases generally did not cause deleterious growth effects, whilst differential improvement patterns were observed for the two reporter proteins (Sf-Cel3A and Te-Cel7A). Simultaneous over-expression of up to three of these components, in strains secreting the more efficiently expressed Sf-Cel3A, illustrated a slight decrease in osmotic tolerance at elevated NaCl concentrations, as well as a detectable decrease in ethanol tolerance at increased concentrations."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "This work illustrates the potential of engineering components of the anterograde secretory pathway, particularly its SNARE components, for the improvement of heterologous cellulase secretion."

For more information on this research see: Over-expression of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae exocytic SNARE genes increased heterologous cellulase secretion. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2014;98(12):5567-5578. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology can be contacted at: Springer, 233 Spring St, New York, NY 10013, USA. (Springer - www.springer.com; Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - www.springerlink.com/content/0175-7598/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from J.H.D. Van Zyl, University of Stellenbosch, Dept. of Microbiol, ZA-7602 Stellenbosch, South Africa. Additional authors for this research include R. Den Haan and W.H. Van Zyl (see also Enzymes and Coenzymes).

Keywords for this news article include: Cellulases, Stellenbosch, South Africa, Glucosidases, Life Sciences, Saccharomycetales, Saccharomycetaceae, Glycoside Hydrolases, Enzymes and Coenzymes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


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Source: Biotech Week


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